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Columbia’s CCP: A Case Study

  • Train middle and high school youth to constructively manage anger to reduce youth violence by promoting non-violent alternatives for resolving conflict within schools and to increase youth leadership skills through participation in school and violence prevention ac- tivities. A contract was awarded to Dr. Ronald D. Miles, Richland County School District One;

  • Create a drug court diversionary program which provides treat- ment in lieu of incarceration for drug-addicted offenders. A con- tract was awarded to Lexington/Richland Alcohol & Drug Abuse.

At this point, it is important to return to a discussion of the community mo- bilizers and what they represent in this effort. Perhaps it would be wisest to think of them schematically as the hub of a wheel. City agencies, service agencies, volunteer efforts, and CCP funded programs are at the rim, to be brought to bear as the need requires. Mobilizers operate out of broad goals

first conceptualized and made operational community mobilizers, their duties include

in Henley Homes in 1990.

As

working

with

citizens,

organiza-

tions, and governmental agencies to identify problems and to identify solutions or ways to manage them. Many problems can be managed or

either solved

by

citizens

themselves

(at

times

with

some

prodding

by

mobilizers

or

residen-

tial

police):

reminding

teens

of

their

responsibilities,

being

volunteers

in

training

efforts,

cleaning

up

vacant

lots,

planting

gardens,

maintaining

prop-

erty, cleaning problems are

graffiti—the list is also facilitated by

endless. Such community efforts to manage the availability of small CCP-funded prob-

lem-solving

grants

that

can

range

from

several

hundred

to

several

thousand

dollars.

Other

problems

can

be

managed

by

existing

programs

or

agencies

(again, at times with warning, educating, or

some prodding by mobilizers even removing troublemakers

or police):

police, by

from

the

community

if

the

problem

is

serious

enough;

schools,

by

educating;

housing

authorities,

by

holding

people

accountable;

hospitals,

through

routine

care

and

counseling;

probation, by holding offenders accountable and finding services and so on. Other persons (especially at risk youth) need specialized some, mere referral is enough—they need help, know it, are eager

for them; care. For to receive

it, and get it. For others, they need and want manage their lives—they have young children or

help but find it difficult to transportation is a problem.

Yet

others

are

ambivalent

about

needing

or

wanting

help

and

avoid

getting

it

by

using

excuses,

arguing

for

example,

“I’m

just

too

busy,”

or

“I

can’t

get

a

baby sitter.” Finally, others are bound and determined not to will only do so if coerced. Columbia’s CCP efforts are designed

get help and to give mobi-

lizers the tools they need to provide the broadest base of highly motivated, ambivalent about receiving services, or of some form of external help.

services—whether hostile to the idea

BOTEC ANALYSIS CORPORATION

21

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