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Columbia’s CCP: A Case Study

Service Delivery

As noted previously, contracts for service were let in 5 general areas: citizen mobilization, diversionary programs, alternatives to incarceration; school and violence prevention; and to create a drug court. The CCP coordinator has re- quired regular reporting and self-evaluation by each of the agencies. All re- ported regularly and appeared to be operating in accord with their plans. The following have been so successful that they have been funded by local sources.

The first is the adult drug court. During the last quarter of 1997 the adult drug court screened and rejected 60 defendants, had 40 defendants involved in the application process, had 40 active defendants (10 of whom were admit- ted during this quarter), removed 7 persons from the program (6 failed and one failed to attend), and graduated one defendant. Although the program had to deal with judicial turnover, it was generally viewed as a success. Re- cent judicial appointees appear to be as committed to the idea of drug courts as the original judges.

But perhaps the surest sign of the popularity of the idea of drug courts is that Columbia has developed a juvenile drug court. This program was developed as a consequence of the perceived success of the adult drug court and will be funded by the Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. The juvenile drug court was convened on January 5, 1998, and two youths were admitted to the program.

The second notable success was the alternatives to incarceration program,

Passports to Success.

In December of 1997 it graduated its first five

niles. agreed

the Department of Juvenile Justice to fund the effort in the future.

&

Richland

School

District

juve- have

The “Survival Training for Parents” described in the original case suffered primarily from its popularity – apparently publicity from participants them- selves to peers. Forty parents were expected to participate during the grant

year. Seventy-seven participated, putting a strain not only on service staff, but on staff required for child care and on the ability

the direct of the pro-

gram were

to provide meals for participants and their children.

managed

by

the

participation

of

additional

agencies,

These strains

not

part

of

the

original

program

of

recipients

of

grant

funds:

Family

Connection

of

S.C.,

Family Literacy Program/Richland School ganization, and the community mobilizers.

District

One,

Parish

Nurses

Or-

BOTEC Analysis Corporation

35

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