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A Curriculum Management Audit - page 49 / 140

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To assess the during visits

use of guides, auditors examined documents, questioned teachers and administrators

to

schools,

and

reviewed

instructional

planning

documents.

Policies

and

other

directives

reviewed

did

not

identify

requirements

governing

the

use

of

curriculum

guides.

During

school visits, auditors asked teachers observed classes in action. Some were

and administrators about the use of curriculum aware of the curriculum guides and some of them

guides and were using

them, especially at the seldom used curriculum

elementary and middle school levels. But some acknowledged that they guides in planning. Most complained that the guides were not user-friendly

and therefore introduced to

difficult to use. the teachers in

Others complained about the method

the

district.

The

following

comments

in by

which the guides were district administrators,

principals, assistant principals, and teachers illustrate these points:

“The way the curriculum was presented makes the teachers not want to use it.” “Based upon what is out there, I don’t think that teachers are using the curriculum guides.” “Guides (curriculum) are daunting. Teachers don’t use them.” “Even though the curriculum guides are great, they were forced upon the staff and therefore

many staff members are resistant to using them.” “Implementation (of curriculum guides) is still very uneven

. [We] still struggle with teachers,

especially at the high school level, who make only tangential reference to the curriculum when developing their course content.”

On the other hand, few principals and teachers made some positive statements on the use of guides such as:

  • “Each grade level takes their part (of the curriculum guides) out. They have the previous grade level and the next in them. They have weekly meetings around them.”

  • “We have a curriculum document that drives the course content. First year Algebra teachers get together every week to discuss what to teach…”

It is important to note; however, that the courses of study themselves are not adequate in quality to direct instruction (see Finding 2.2).

In summary, curriculum guides were not widely used as work plans for teaching, especially at the secondary level. Curriculum guide use is ineffective for focused and consistent teaching and learning.

Finding 2.4: Classroom Activities Show Little Congruence with District Expectations for Robust and Challenging Classroom Methods and Activities.

Diversity in approach and the wide use of varied teaching methods is a key to promoting student growth, combating student boredom, and reaching all segments of the student population. The Clover Park School District refers to these issues in a number of ways, as indicated by the following:

District Mission Statement: The Clover Park School District has adopted the following mission statement.

The mission of the Clover Park School District is to teach all children what they need to know to succeed and contribute to their community. We will accomplish this by:

  • Setting high standards

  • Demanding excellence

  • Maintaining accountability

  • Improving instruction

  • Strengthening partnerships

  • Communicating openly

  • Encouraging self-driven motivation

Clover Park School District Audit Report Page 43

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