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78 / 140

#

%

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%

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%

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%

#

%

370

16%

476

24%

158

8%

46

2%

1048

50%

199

13%

560

37%

109

7%

20

1%

637

42%

324

11%

717

25%

265

9%

40

1%

1478

52%

192

7%

1001

36%

182

7%

88

3%

1347

48%

663

9%

1689

23%

855

12%

111

2%

3881

54%

35

5%

270

38%

30

4%

23

3%

355

50%

1999-2000

Native

White/

Asian

Black

Hispanic

American

Other

Exhibit 3.5.8 Disciplinary Actions by Ethnicity District-wide Clover Park School District

School Level High School

Disciplinary Actions (1525) Middle School

Disciplinary Actions (2810) Elementary School

Disciplinary Actions (712) District data

Exhibit 3.5.8 indicates:

  • Black students are over-represented in disciplinary actions taken at the elementary, middle, and high schools levels.

  • Asian, Hispanic, and White students are under-represented at all levels.

  • Native American students are involved in disciplinary actions at all levels at a rate similar to their distribution in the student population.

Overall, disciplinary actions do not reflect the ethnic composition of the total district student enrollment.

Allocation of Resources

Equity in curriculum delivery dictates that resources flow to the areas of greatest need. Districts show evidence of equity when formulas for the allocation of resources are needs-driven rather than based on equal distribution of resources. A common indicator for levels of need among student groups is the percentage of students identified as “economically disadvantaged,” based on the percentage of students eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunch.

The auditors found that district resources are generally allocated to schools on a per pupil basis (see Finding 5.1). With site-based management, schools have flexibility in distributing their funds to meet the needs of their students (see Finding 5.3). The schools also receive funds from other sources, such as Title I funds, grants, PTA donations, and business partnerships, which can contribute to inequities. For example, school-based staff stated that these contributions have made possible the hiring of additional staff, the initiation of additional programs (see Finding 5.4), the purchase of extra library books and media materials, and the acquisition of additional computers.

Library Books Per Student

The auditors found a wide variation across the district in the

the

elementary

level.

Exhibit

3.5.9

shows

the

distribution

numbers of of library

library books

books per pupil at per student at the

elementary, middle, and high schools.

Clover Park School District Audit Report Page 72

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