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16 – MONDAY, APRIL 10, 2006

WEATHER

THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL

3-DAY FORECAST TODAY

57°

Mostly cloudy with a couple of showers

TONIGHT

46°

Cloudy, chance for a couple of showers; cool

TUESDAY

54°

47°

Rain

WEDNESDAY

59°

44°

SUN AND MOON

Sunrise today ............. 6:44 a.m. Sunset tonight ............ 7:45 p.m. Moonrise today .......... 5:13 p.m. Moonset today ........... 5:32 a.m.

MOON PHASES

Full

Last

New

First

Apr. 13 Apr. 20 Apr. 27

May 4

ALMANAC

Ukiah through 2 p.m. Sunday Temperature

High ............................... Low ............................... Normal high ................... Normal low ..................... Record high .................. Record low ....................

............... 54° ............... 47° ............... 68° ............... 42° .. 96° in 1951 .. 28° in 1933

Precipitation

24 hrs to 2 p.m. Sun. .... Month to date ................ Normal month to date .... Season to date .............. Last season to date ...... Normal season to date ..

............ 0.32” ............ 2.88” ............ 0.94” .......... 50.87” .......... 36.53” .......... 36.17”

REGIONAL WEATHER

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Rockport 58/47

Laytonville 56/45

Covelo 57/45

Westport 58/47

Fort Bragg

Willows

55/46

60/46

47/44

56/44

Redwood Valley

UKIAH

57/45

Lakeport 57/47

Elk

Willits

57/46

Philo 58/48

Boonville 58/47

Lucerne 57/47

Gualala 57/45

Clearlake 58/46

Cloverdale 60/49

Crescent City

55/45/sh

56/45/r

Death Valley

76/50/pc

77/53/pc

Downey

64/50/pc

70/53/r

Encinitas

63/51/pc

65/52/pc

Escondido

65/49/pc

71/48/pc

Eureka

57/44/sh

63/43/r

Today

Tue.

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Anaheim Antioch

68/51/pc 59/47/sh

73/51/pc 62/51/r 68/47/r 63/49/r 62/50/r 71/50/pc 61/48/r 63/37/c 81/55/pc 68/50/r 66/38/r 66/49/r 62/51/pc 62/47/r

Arroyo Grande Atascadero Auburn Barstow Big Sur Bishop Blythe Burbank California City Carpinteria Catalina Chico

62/43/sh 61/47/sh 58/46/sh 66/47/pc 59/49/c 58/34/c 81/54/pc 63/49/pc 61/38/pc 61/47/sh 60/47/pc 60/46/sh

Fort Bragg Fresno Gilroy Indio Irvine Hollywood

55/46/sh 64/48/sh 66/46/c 76/51/pc 64/52/pc 64/50/pc

Lake Arrowhead 45/37/pc

Lodi Lompoc Long Beach Los Angeles Mammoth Marysville Modesto Monrovia Monterey

62/48/sh 61/44/sh 64/50/pc 64/52/pc 50/24/sh 59/46/sh 63/47/sh 67/50/pc 60/47/c

Morro Bay

61/49/sh

CALIFORNIA CITIES

63/46/r 66/52/c 70/52/r 79/52/pc 71/52/pc 69/53/r 52/37/pc 65/50/r 65/46/r 68/52/r 68/54/r 48/28/c 61/50/r 67/52/c 73/50/r 65/49/r 65/51/r

San Bernardino 65/46/pc

71/49/pc

San Diego

64/55/pc

67/56/pc

San Fernando

61/49/pc

69/50/r

San Francisco

59/51/sh

64/56/r

Today

City

Hi/Lo/W

Napa Needles Oakland Ontario Orange Oxnard

63/49/sh 78/53/pc 61/52/sh 64/47/pc 65/47/pc 60/49/pc

Palm Springs

75/54/pc

Pasadena Pomona Potter Valley Redding Riverside Sacramento Salinas

62/51/pc 65/46/pc 57/45/sh 58/45/sh 65/46/pc 60/48/sh 62/46/c

Santa Monica

64/51/pc

68/53/r

Santa Rosa

60/48/sh

66/54/r

Tue.

Hi/Lo/W

61/52/r 77/56/pc 65/54/r 70/51/pc 72/46/pc 65/50/r 78/58/pc 70/51/r 71/44/pc 55/46/r 62/47/r 70/47/pc 64/52/r 74/47/r

San Jose

63/50/sh

San Luis Obisp San Rafael Santa Ana Santa Barbara Santa Cruz

o 62/47/sh 61/51/sh 64/53/pc 61/46/sh 62/48/sh

Yosemite Valley 55/33/c

Yreka

54/35/sh

43/34/r 65/49/r 43/34/r 66/54/r 62/53/r 64/51/r 69/50/r 68/50/c 55/45/r 58/37/c 54/36/r

67/55/r 67/47/r 64/56/r 69/52/pc 67/49/r 66/51/r

S. Lake Tahoe

40/29/sn

Stockton

64/49/sh

Tahoe Valley

40/29/sn

Torrance Vacaville Vallejo Van Nuys Visalia Willits

61/52/pc 60/48/sh 62/50/sh 61/49/pc 63/50/c 56/44/sh

Mostly cloudy, chance for a couple of showers

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-

Lake Mendocino – Lake level: N/R; Storage: NR; Inflow: N/R Outflow: N/R Air quality – Not available

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FOLLOW-UP

Fort Bragg shelter gets more hours, Animal Control process streamlined

By FRANK HARTZELL Fort Bragg Advocate-News

FORT BRAGG - When Mandi Liberty was briefly fired last year from her job at Mendocino County Animal Care and Control, her boss, Animal Control Officer Susan Bottom was very upset.

Local animal-loving groups such as the Eileen Hawthorne Fund for Animals were also unhappy about the move, which many felt was in retaliation for Liberty talking to the grand jury, which had sharply criticized the Animal Control department.

But when Liberty was quickly rein- stated as an extra help worker by County Chief Executive Officer John Ball, the biggest celebration was a cacophony of barking, said Bottom.

“When Mandi’s gone, the animals miss her. They wait for her to come back,” said Bottom.

The “un-firing” of Liberty came about a week after the former head of Animal Control and the then supervisor of the Ukiah Shelter made the surprise Wednesday afternoon ouster. At that time, animals were also taken from the shelter, several of which may have been improperly euthanized, a county inves- tigative report found.

A county investigation found that 22 cats were taken from the Fort Bragg shelter and 15 of them euthanized. Five dogs were taken from Fort Bragg to Ukiah, with two euthanized. Liberty and Bottom had a long history of not eutha- nizing animals whenever possible. Animal Control officials at the time denied that animals were euthanized in Ukiah after being removed.

That led to a review of the county’s euthanasia procedures, a process that is still under way with a five-year strategic process involving community groups as

well as John Morley, a new boss in a revamped Animal Care and Control operation.

The Fort Bragg shelter is now open to the public more hours, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, with Saturday hours being considered for later in the spring.

Liberty is now a full-time employee, after being used as an extra help worker for several years, often working full- time but being paid as extra help.

She went through the application and interview process and was given the full-time position effective Feb. 27.

“I was happy to take the position; considering everything that had tran- spired I wasn’t completely certain that the position would be mine,” Liberty said.

“Many things are changing that addressed the grand jury’s questions and concerns, ranging from new dog beds to different cleaning procedures,” Liberty said.

Ball had already announced plans to make the county more efficient by con- solidating departments when Liberty was removed while Bottom was away an action based on the euthanizing of Bottom's own cat. The department itself got eliminated as a separate entity in that revamping process.

Morley is now both the head of the Ukiah shelter and the manager of what is still called Animal Care and Control, reporting to John Rogers in the Division of Environmental Health, who reports to the director of the Department of Public Health, Carol Mordhorst.

When the situation erupted, Dorothy Ferri of SEIU Local 707 said the union got involved despite Liberty’s status as an extra help employee, who are not eli- gible to join the union.

“That did not stop this union from

doing everything possible to get her reinstated,” Ferri said.

“Mandi is well known in Fort Bragg for her dedication to providing quality services to the Fort Bragg community as well as protecting the rights of animals. When Mandi was fired we not only had a union issue, but we also had a commu- nity issue,” Ferri said.

“Working together, the community and the union were able to get the atten- tion this situation needed. CEO John Ball must also be given credit for not only sincerely listening to the union and the community, but for taking the neces- sary actions to right this wrong. Ball did what we would never have seen under the previous administration,” Ferri said.

Morley said the county is working on getting the spay and neuter Care-A-Van to the coast more often. A stakeholders group, which involves non-profit agen- cies as well as Liberty, is meeting monthly.

“Another priority issue we will be working on over the next 12 months is promoting adoptions,” Morley said.

Morley said some of the grand jury's concerns, such as a lack of beds for dogs at the Ukiah Shelter, were quickly fixed last fall. The new five-year process breaks down problems into different areas for action over time.

For example, Animal Control is now seeking to improve intake methods that in the past meant animals were quickly put down in Ukiah, while the Fort Bragg shelter kept animals longer.

“We need to improve certain proce- dures, that maybe weren’t being done on a consistent basis in the past,” Morley said.

Those include health screening, checking for a microchip on each animal brought in and vaccination protocols, he said.

Salmon

Continued from Page 1

this year's salmon season, Thompson blasted the Bush administration for “incompe- tence and gross mismanage- ment of the Klamath River.”

Thompson’s

First

Congressional

District

includes the southern Klamath Basin. In the fall of 2002, after Interior Secretary Gale Norton refused to meet with Thompson to discuss the fish kill of 80,000 adult salmon, Thompson dumped 500 pounds of dead salmon on the steps of the Interior Department during a press conference calling attention to the problem.

The public learned on Friday that the Justice Department plans on asking

Water

Continued from Page 1

“You have to keep yourself entertained,” her friend, Mele Pateta said. If it wasn’t rain- ing, Pateta would be swim- ming at the lake, she said. Her sister, Jodan, said she’d be “living in the lake.”

Cherrene Pageau welcomes the sun, but she isn’t com- plaining about the rain.

“It’s good for the earth. It needs it,” she said.

With that said, Pageau added, “I’m ready for my summer.”

Meanwhile, she said she spends her time “inside.”

Two boys leaving the store on their bicycles weren’t

U.S. District Court Judge Saundra Armstrong to recon- sider her ruling that limited the amount of water diverted from the Klamath and its struggling salmon.

Democrats up and down the coast widely noted that Armstrong’s ruling aided in the protection of salmon and the redevelopment of their habitat on the Klamath River

"This decision is nothing short of a slap in the face to fishing families and coastal communities in California and Oregon," Thompson said. "We are reeling from yester- day's decision to severely limit the season and today the Bush administration has shown complete disregard for the health of the Klamath and the livelihoods of thousands of people who live along our coast.”

thrilled about riding in the rain. “I don’t like it ’cause it’s kind of annoying. It gets in our eyes and stuff,” 11-year- old Matt Fenton said.

Contrarily, Octaviano Aguilar, who also uses a bicy- cle to get around town, said the rain does not bother him at all. “It’s wonderful. If it was- n’t raining we would have dry ground and we’d be having forest fires.”

Matthew Britton, who was not around when Aguilar spoke, shared his sentiments nonetheless. “I like the rain; it feels good. I fight fire during the summer and the rain helps out ... but also a lot of rain is a bad thing for land erosion.”

Laura Clark can be reached at udjlc@pacific.net.

Thousands march in S.D.

By ELLIOT SPAGAT The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Thousands of demonstra- tors marched through the streets of the nation’s largest city on the Mexican border Sunday, demanding Congress abandon an effort to crack down on an estimated 11 mil- lion people living in the United States ille- gally.

Nearly 20,000 people gathered at Balboa Park — home to the San Diego Zoo and a slew of museums — before heading to the heart of downtown and a county administra- tion building, police said. No arrests were reported.

Many of the demonstrators wore white and carried signs that read “We are Americans!” and “We march today, we vote tomorrow.”

A large number of Mexican and American flags were part of the protest, which followed two weeks of careful planning that included an effort to encourage participants to wave American flags.

“The more American flags, the better this is going to be,” said Ben Monterroso, an organizer with Service Employees International Union Local 1877.

Migrant advocates have expressed con-

cerns that throngs of people waving Mexican flags might spark a backlash. Organizers of Sunday’s event scrambled to find as many American flags as they could to distribute to marchers.

Samuel Barriga, 50, of San Marcos was given an American flag and a sign that read “Immigrant values are family values.” Barriga said he was participating in the demonstration because he feared his cousins, friends and neighbors could be deported if efforts to crack down on illegal immigration succeed.

“They want to treat us like criminals,” Barriga said. “We’re not criminals. We’re hard workers.”

San Diego, which borders Tijuana, Mexico, witnessed a spate of student walk- outs in late March, a protest against legisla- tion approved by the House in December that would make felons of illegal immigrants and erect about 700 miles of border fencing.

The Mexican consul in San Diego, Luis Cabrera, appeared on Spanish-language tele- vision at the time to discourage students from waving Mexican flags.

The demonstration occurred on the eve of dozens of protests planned across the country on Monday.

Exit exam alterations in Bay Area district?

The Associated Press

RICHMOND — School officials are considering whether to award diplomas to students who failed California’s high school exit exam, but are otherwise eligi- ble to graduate.

Dave Brown, a West Contra Costa Unified School District trustee, said the law unfairly penalizes students from chronically underfunded schools by pinning most of their diploma hopes on a sin- gle exam.

“There’s a whole group of kids who are working really hard and, for whatever reason, can’t pass this exam,” Brown said. “We’re not talking about dumping the exam. We’re only asking the state to do what other states have done

  • provide multiple measures

for kids to show what they know.”

Nearly 500 seniors in a class of nearly 2,000 students in the district have either failed the exam or are await- ing results. Statewide, about 48,000 seniors are in the same situation. That’s why residents of public school districts throughout the state are watching to see how West Contra Costa Unified trustees vote during a special meeting Monday.

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