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ize both short- and long-term goals for learning, careers, and life. Motivational interviewing has deepened my understanding of challenges facing my students, helped me develop stronger communication skills, and better equipped me to motivate and guide students. Carefully guided dis- cussions can help to move a student from a place of frustration and academ- ic despair to one of hope and encouragement. What may be most helpful for students is the opportunity to discuss an issue with someone who is real- ly engaged and listening. Despite busy schedules of teaching and research, this is a gift we can give our students which is not soon forgotten.

ENDNOTES

Note: To learn more about motivational interviewing, visit www.motivationalinterview.org and the American Academy of Family Physicans: www.aafp.org/afp/20000301/1409.html.

  • 1.

    Miller and Rose. “Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing.” The American Psychologist.

  • 2.

    Ibid.

  • 3.

    Atkinson. “Motivational Interviewing Strategies for Disaffected Secondary School Students: A

4.

Case Example.” Ibid and Rosengren. Building Motivational Interviewing Skills, A Practitioner Workbook.

WORKS CITED

Atkinson, Cathy and Kevin Woods. “Motivational Interviewing Strategies for Disaffected Secondary School Students: A Case Example.” Educational Psychology in Practice 19.1 (2003): 49-64.

Fuller, Catherine and Phil Taylor. A Toolkit of Motivational Skills. West Sussex, England; John Wiley, 2009.

Miller, William. R., and Stephen Rollnick. “Ten Things that Motivational Interviewing is Not.” Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 37.2 (2009): 129-40.

Miller, William. R., and G. S. Rose. “Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing.” The American Psychologist 64.6 (2009): 527-37.

Miller, William. R. “Conversation with William R. Miller.” Addiction (Abingdon, England) 104.6 (2009): 883-93.

“Motivational Interviewing: What is it?” March 2010 Accessed at: http://motivationalinterview.org/clinical/overview.html.

Rosengren, David. B. Building Motivational Interviewing Skills, A Practitioner Workbook. New York: Guilford Press, 2009.

White, L. L., J. D. Gazewood, and A. L. Mounsey. “Teaching Students Behavior Change Skills: Description and Assessment of a New Motivational Interviewing Curriculum.” Medical Teacher 29.4 (2007): e67-71.

Lisa A. Sheldon holds a master of science degree in community nutrition and is a Ph.D. student in public health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and an adjunct professor at Greenfield Community College teaching Introduction to Nutrition. Her research interests include nutrition education through the lifespan and the use of motivational interviewing in education- al settings. She is the author of Olive Oil Baking (Turne , 2007) and a newspaper columnist.

THE NEA HIGHER EDUCATION JOURNAL

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