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GERMAN HISTORICAL INSTITUTE WASHNGTON, D.C. ANNUAL LECTURE SERIES No. 8 - page 12 / 46

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Atlantic.1 Yet how this situation came to be says much, not only about medieval Germany in America but about the at times tortured relationship between German and American intellectual traditions during the past century.

This lack of interest in medieval Germany stands in sharp contrast to the state of historical studies a century ago. Medieval German history and German scholarship played a major role in the creation of modem historical studies in this country in the second half of the nineteenth century. For the first generations of scholars of historical studies, German history was deemed an essential part of the training, not only of medievalists but of all historians. No better qualifications could be imagined than to have studied in the great medieval seminars of Germany or to have been a (fellow) with the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, the great center of medieval German history. The founders of the professional study of history in America had largely been trained in Leipzig, Berlin, and Heidelberg, and the twin German disciplines of medieval history and philology were particularly significant in this process, first at the University of Michigan and Harvard University, then especially at Johns Hopkins Universitys Seminar in History and Politics, which is widely considered to be the founding institution of the professional study of history in this country. Although not primarily 2

1 For an excellent survey of the historiography of medieval Germany in the United States and Great Britain that concentrates more on the post-World War I period than does this paper, see Edward Peters, More Trouble With Henry: The Historiography of Medieval Germany in the Angloliterate World, 18881995,28 (1995): 4772.

2 Ernst Schulin, German and American Historiography in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,in

, ed. Hartmut Lehmann and James J. Sheehan (New York, 1991), 13, n. 8. On early medieval scholarship in America in general, see Hans Rudolf Guggis-

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