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GERMAN HISTORICAL INSTITUTE WASHNGTON, D.C. ANNUAL LECTURE SERIES No. 8 - page 20 / 46

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However, although the foregoing account of the decline of German medieval history in the United States is not entirely incorrect, it would be superficial and misleading to suggest that the repudiation of German history was simply the result of the animosities of two destructive wars and the fortuitous research interests of refugee medievalists. A more accurate analysis suggests that from the days of Adams, Americans have had an ambivalent attitude toward the dominant tradition of German historiography, which the war experience only allowed to emerge more explicitly. Likewise, the aspects of medieval German history most appreciated by these American scholars did not represent the mainstream of late nineteenth-century German scholarship. American historians from Adams on were more interested in using aspects of the German past as developed by German medievalists as explanatory models for American history than to come to terms with German history per se. Moreover, among those Americans who really understood and appreciated the dynamism of historical discourse within the German historical community, sympathies were largely with the broad, integrative approach to German history represented by Karl Lamprecht, not with the mainstream of German political historians represented by Georg von Below.15 Since, by the end of the World War I,

Morrison of Rutgers, William Percy of the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and Richard Rouse of UCLA.

15 As early as 1897 Earle Wilbur Dow, a historian at the University of Michigan who had studied briefly in Leipzig in 1894 and again in 1897, published a long and generally

favorable discussion of Lamprechts

: Features of the New History:

Apropos of Lamprechts Deutsche Geschichte,

3 (1898):

431448 Dow showed a great familiarity with Lamprecht's work and the debate that it had engendered both within and beyond the German intellectual world. Dows enthusiasm for a history that encompasses the activities of man as a social being; political phenomena are neither the only facts to be considered, nor the state the

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