X hits on this document

PDF document

GERMAN HISTORICAL INSTITUTE WASHNGTON, D.C. ANNUAL LECTURE SERIES No. 8 - page 23 / 46

169 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

23 / 46

21

history.19 The first great impulse toward German history was inextricably combined with the Aryan racist theories of neo-Darwinism commonly referred to as the Teutonic origins thesis. This idea, developing first in German Romantic historiography and then picked up and amplified by British liberal historians, argued that primitive Germanic society was the source of first German, then Anglo-Saxon, and finally American political institutions and liberties. America, and especially Anglo-Saxon America, was thus the culmination of Germanic racial evolution.

Herbert Baxter Adams was the major proponent of this thesis in the

United States, although it was far from original with him. In the 1870s he had gone to Berlin to study political science with Heinrich von Treitschke, Ernst Curtius, and Hermann Grimm and then moved to Heidelberg in 1875 to study with Johann Caspar Bluntschli. He also attended lectures of Eduard A. Winkelmann on historical methodology and medieval historiography. His experience in medieval history was a secondary aspect of his studies but proved to be particularly influential to him later. In 1884 he described his experience in the Heidelberg seminaries (seminars) of Professors Bluntschli and Bernhard Erdmannsdörffer. The former was his primary professor, but the latters seminar on Otto of Freising's seems to have most profoundly affected the young American. He recalled that the seminar met once a week in Erdmannsdörffer's home. Each student had a copy of the text, and each week a different member of the seminar translated and commented in the light of parallel citations from other authors belonging to Bishop Ottos time, who are to be found in the folio edition of

Pertzs Monumenta Germaniae Historica.

20

19

Lehmann/Sheehan, eds.,

20

Herbert B. Adams,

,6

, Johns Hopkins University Studies

in Historical and Political Science II, nos. 12 (Baltimore, 1884), 6568.

Document info
Document views169
Page views169
Page last viewedFri Dec 09 19:42:22 UTC 2016
Pages46
Paragraphs466
Words10602

Comments