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GERMAN HISTORICAL INSTITUTE WASHNGTON, D.C. ANNUAL LECTURE SERIES No. 8 - page 38 / 46

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36

Schramm,11 nevertheless expressly agreed with the policies of the new regime. 12

Geary also accurately describes the emigration situation after 1933

13

He

furthermore pinpoints the consequences for medieval scholarship that arose because many of the émigrés had changed their scientific focus. In some instances, the results were positive, as in the case of Ernst H. Kantorowicz. As eminent historian of the George Circle, Kantorowicz was an uncompromising opponent of the Weimar Republic, as can be seen from his

first major work,

, published in 1927

14

Later, in

the United States, he adopted entirely different political convictions and scientific principles and, because of this, also devoted himself to different research goals in medieval history.

The changes in the approach to medieval studies associated with the emigration situation also had, however, negative consequences for medieval scholarship. Take, for instance, Hans Baron. Baron was a prominent representative of Renaissance research, which was, at that time, still rooted in the field of medieval studies. However, after his emigration, he devoted his

11 Joist Grolle, (Hamburg, 1989). Karen Schönwälder, (Frankfurt a.M/New York, 1992). Hartmut Lehmann and James J. Sheehan, eds., (New York, 1991). Otto Gerhard Oexle, "Das Mittelalter als Waffe. Ernst H. Kantorowicz' 'Kaiser Friedrich der Zweite' in den politischen Kontroversen der Weimarer Republik," in: id., 12 13 14

(Göttingen, 1996, forthcoming).

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