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Chabot College

Course Outline for History 8, Page 2

Fall 2004

1.

The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1900

a.

The rise of industrial capitalism and corporate America; the effects of economic transformation on various socioeconomic classes, racial/ethnic minorities, and women.

b.

the rise of the city and the creation of a national urban culture

c.

immigration: the experiences and contributions of diverse Europeans, Asians and Latinos in various geographic regions of the U.S.

d.

challenges to government and corporate power, resistance and reform; the Chinese in California, African American leadership & protest, Native American resistance in the West, revolts in the workplace, women reformers, the populist revolt

e.

U.S. imperialism and the Spanish-American-Cuban-Filipino War; critics of imperialism

2.

Progressivism at Home/Colonial Competition and Revolution Abroad, 1900-1929

a.

The Progressive era: migration and immigration from southern/eastern Europe, Mexico, and Asia; Chinese Exclusion Act; reform and radical politics; progressive amendments to the California state constitution; women suffrage movement; expansion of national power.

b.

The upheaval of war and revolution abroad; the U.S. and World War I; domestic consequences of mobilization and participation; the Great African American Migration; expanding workplace roles for women.

c.

The 1920s and the coalescence of “modern” America; consumer culture; the decline of reform; reactionary impulses (the KKK, nativism); black nationalism; the Harlem Renaissance; development of California and the West; the alliance of business and politics.

3.

Economic Depression, World War II, and Rise of U.S. Hegemony, 1929-1953

a.

economic collapse, the Great Depression, the New Deal; migrations; the emergence of a new political coalition; the rise of the labor movement.

b.

The United States and World War II; radical, reactionary and moderate responses to economic depression in the world; U.S. mobilization for war; the military-industrial complex; California and defense industries; the role of women in factories and in the war; Japanese internment; the bracero program; the Double-V campaign; moral and ethical issues of the war.

c.

The roots and nature of the Cold War; global destruction and political vacuums; class conflicts; the rise of the national security state; containment; colonialism; anti-communist hysteria; “hot” wars in Greece, Korea, etc.

4.

Post-War America, 1953-1979

a.

Cold War American Culture: economic growth, baby boom, conformity; race, class, and domesticity; the “feminine mystique”; the Civil Rights movement; rebellious youth and counter culture; mobilizations for peace and the environment.

b.

The Longest War: the U.S. in Vietnam; the social, political, and economic consequences; the Warren Court; the Great Society; the anti-war movement.

c.

The New Left; from civil rights to Black Power; women’s liberation movement; conservative backlash.

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