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71:Upper Fort Garry. June 1862

Finbar and Belle are walking in the grounds of St Boniface Cathedral. Knowing that Finbar is to leave the following day, Belle begins to tell her story. When she has finished Finbar holds her. Both, at last, make their feelings for each other known. She asks him to make love to her. They sleep together. In the morning they talk about Belle’s past. Finbar says that nobody should have to endure the form of life she was born into. Belle asks him what can be done to change it. Finbar smiles as he tells her to wait and see. He reassures her that he will be safe as he leaves to join the departing army.

72:Buffalo, NY. July 1862

Lieutenant Colonel John O’Neill is reviewing the 11,000 men he now has under his command. They are stationed along a stretch of river, five miles upstream from Niagara Falls. The twenty barges, which will be used to transport the army across the river into Canada, are in a shipyard, owned by Vessy & Blake, 50 miles to the west along Lake Erie. Nobody has appeared to make the connection. The assumption being made by the American authorities, and fuelled by press speculation, is that the trains that have been commissioned by O’Neill in Buffalo and Rochester are to be used to transport the Irish army to Boston, where they will meet up with another regiment under the command of the veteran General Todd. O’Neill cannot contain his glee when a recent copy of the London Times is given to him. The paper reports that British intelligence has unearthed a Fenian plan to invade Ireland and has despatched an extra 20,000 troops to the country, 2,000 of which will be sent from Canada. Three influential American newspapers were already championing the cause of Irish independence and asking the American people to support the invasion. O’Neill puts this information into a letter, along with confirmation that General Todd’s men are ready to move from their camp in St Albans. Adding the detailed update of the Civil War that has been requested, O’Neill hands the letter to a Metis messenger who heads across the Canadian border and rides north.

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