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ENERGY STAR Designation by Publicity Category

In 2009, a significantly larger proportion of households in high- than in low-publicity areas thought the U.S. government decides if a product deserves the label: 51 percent in high-publicity areas and 37 percent in low-publicity areas. This difference is significant at the 10-percent level (p-value = 0.075). The proportion for both categories was 34 percent in 2008.

In low-publicity areas, 25 percent of respondents thought product manufacturers themselves decided if a product received the ENERGY STAR label, compared to only 12 percent of respondents in high-publicity areas. This difference is statistically significant at the 5-percent level of confidence.

Designates ENERGY STAR-Labeled Product by Publicity Category (Base = Recognize label (aided), n=446)

*U.S. government

37%

51%

Underwriters Laboratories

19% 24%

Electric and gas utility

**Product manufacturer

17% 10% 12%

25%

Other

2% 1%

High Publicity Low Publicity

Retailer/store

<1% 3%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

**

High- and low-publicity areas proportions are statistically different from each other at the 5-percent level of significance (p-value0.05).

*

High- and low-publicity areas proportions are statistically different from each other at the 10-percent level of significance (p-value0.1).

2 ENERGY STAR PRODUCT SATISFACTION

For most products, household satisfaction with a given product in a product category that has an ENERGY STAR specification does not appear to vary based on whether or not the product had an ENERGY STAR label. On a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 means “very dissatisfied” and 5 means “very satisfied,” products with and without the ENERGY STAR label had an average satisfaction rating between 4.1 and 4.3.

C-2

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