X hits on this document

PDF document

This is a pirated album, released in Spain: - page 4 / 6

14 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

4 / 6

of greatest interest we have chosen to place the interview at the end of this CD.

The concert opens with Pepper’s composition “Pepper Pot”. He recorded the tune for the first time with Stan Kenton’s band at an NBC Broadcast called “The Click” in Philadelphia in early February 1948, and again with Kenton’s band for a CBS radio Broadcast in Avalon, Catalina Island, California, between July 2 and July 8, 1951. His next recording of the tune was made in Hollywood, California on November 25, 1956. The date consisted of a quartet session under Pepper’s name that featured sidemen Russ Freeman on piano, Ben Tucker on bass and Gary Frommer on drums, which would be issued under the title The Art Pepper Quartet. This Chicago performance marks the first time that Pepper would record the tune in over 20 years! He would record it one final time in Los Angeles on December 1 or 2, 1978, for his quartet album Art Pepper Today. On this version at the Jazz Showcase Pepper plays the opening melody and a laidback, swinging solo on alto sax. Pickens continues with an ebullient piano solo followed by Pepper on clarinet trading fours with Rodby for a chorus (with Pickens laying out). Pepper then takes a clarinet solo accompanied only by Rodby for the rest of the tune. This is the only song of the Jazz Showcase concert that features Pepper on clarinet. At the end of the song, a relaxed Pepper tells the audience, “I’m glad you remembered that tune, I had forgotten that tune!’ To which the delighted audience on December 30, 1999. One of the reasons that Campbell would never gain national prominence was that he never toured, preferring to play around the Chicago area, while maintaining a day job as a substance abuse counselor. Although Pepper had never performed with any of these sidemen before, it is quite likely that the rhythm section were all working together regularly as the house band at the Jazz Showcase during this period. Unfortunately, this concert would mark their only known recording together. In fact, the only musicians that would record together apart from this performance were Pickens and Campbell. They recorded together for the first time at a 1974 quartet date in Chicago under the leadership of tenor saxophonist E. Parker McDougal. They would record again for McDougal in 1 980 for his album Blues Tour. Pickens and Campbell’s last known collaboration were for the pianist’s aforementioned 1987 debut album

It’s About Time! Despite Pepper’s unfamiliarity with the band, the group’s chemistry was excellent. Much like the band that would be recorded at the Village Vanguard two weeks later, this group sounds as if it had been performing together for years, with truly inspired playing from Pepper and exceptional accompaniment by the band. The concert was broadcast over the radio, and Pepper was interviewed by the radio presenter mere moments before taking the stage. However, as the music is clearly of greatest interest we have chosen to place the interview at the end of this CD. The concert opens with Pepper’s composition “Pepper Pot”. He recorded the tune for the first time with Stan Kenton’s band at an NBC Broadcast called “The Click” in Philadelphia in early February 1948, and again with Kenton’s band for a CBS radio Broadcast in Avalon, Catalina Island, California, between July 2 and July 8, 1951. His next recording of the tune was made in Hollywood, California on November 25, 1956. The date consisted of a quartet session under Pepper’s name that featured sidemen Russ Freeman on piano, Ben Tucker on bass and Gary Frommer on drums, which would be issued under the title The Art Pepper Quartet. This Chicago performance marks the first time that Pepper would record the tune in over 20 years! He would record it one final time in Los Angeles on December 1 or 2, 1978, for his quartet album Art Pepper Today. On this version at the Jazz Showcase Pepper plays the opening melody and a laidback, swinging solo on alto sax. Pickens continues with

an ebullient piano solo followed by Pepper on clarinet trading fours with Rodby for a chorus (with Pickens laying out). Pepper then takes a clarinet solo accompanied only by Rodby for the rest of the tune. This is the only song of the Jazz Showcase concert that features Pepper on clarinet. At the end of the song, a relaxed Pepper tells the audience, “I’m glad you remembered that tune, I had forgotten that tune!’ To which the delighted audience declared their disbelief. Pepper responded saying, “I really had. I haven’t played that tune ... I used to play that tune with Lee Young’s band and Dexter Gordon in 1943, on Central Avenue, that’s probably long before most of you were ever born!’ Pepper then went on to announce the next song “My Laurie”, which was another of his compositions. In his own words, “This is a tune that I recorded on the next album coming out on Contemporary called No Limit. I wrote it for my wife. It’s probably the best thing I’ve ever written. At least I think so ... “ As Pepper mentioned, the tune would, be recorded for the first time on the March 26, 1977 quartet date for the album No Limit. In the album’s liner notes, Pepper stated that it was, “sort

Document info
Document views14
Page views14
Page last viewedWed Dec 07 20:54:23 UTC 2016
Pages6
Paragraphs22
Words5250

Comments