X hits on this document

PDF document

Iraqi Asylum Seekers in Jordan - page 9 / 36

110 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

9 / 36

Charts courtesy of Mercy Corps/CDC-Sweileh

Health Needs

Needed Social Services and Programs

13%

4%1%

Medicine and health services

4%

10%

Awareness and Counseling

Educational Courses

Medical Centre

Eye glasses

21%

42%

Employment and Financial Services

Children Program

Child Health care

23%

82%

Other (food distribution, religious activities, etc)

Unmet Psychosocial support needs

The Mercy Corps/CDC study found that an overwhelming 77% of Iraqis surveyed mentioned suffering from one or more psychological or emotional problem. Of those who responded in the positive, the most common responses were:

  • Anxiety and depression: 42%

  • Emotional pressure (stress): 22.4% (due to economic and social conditions)

  • Sadness and emotional instability: 20.3%

  • Fear and insecurity: 8.7%

  • Isolation: 6.6%

They also found a gender difference as females tended to suffer more from anxiety, depression, emotional pressure, sadness, and emotional instability, while males were more prone to complain about fear and insecurity.

There are very few services available to attend to the psychological trauma evident in Iraqi refugees, given the stigma surrounding talking to a mental health professional in Iraqi society. An informal assessment with practitioners by CARE estimated that there are a total of 51 practicing psychiatrists in Jordan; 26 operating in private and special consultation clinics and 25 in the Government sectors. Of those who work privately, 23 are in Amman, 2 in Zarqa and 3 in Irbid. Of those who work in the Government sectors, 5 are in the Ministry of Defense, 3 in Jordan University, 3 in Irbid, 1 in Karak, 7 in medical schools, and 6 in the Ministry of Health.

There are very few clinical psychologists in Jordan, numbering between three and five. Two of these expressed interest in cooperating with assistance programmes, notably in the context of training of case workers.

IOM is one of the Middle East specialists on information and training in the psychosocial domain in Jordan. Their study, Psychosocial Status of IDP Communities in Iraq, completed in 2005, contains valuable information applicable to psychosocial work with Iraqis in Jordan. They found that Iraqis present psychosocial uneasiness which includes:

depression and fears withdrawal deterioration of relations within the family lack of social and recreational opportunities

deterioration in social functioning

Report of the ICMC / USCCB Mission – Protection Needs in Jordan

9

Document info
Document views110
Page views110
Page last viewedSat Dec 10 00:06:28 UTC 2016
Pages36
Paragraphs1114
Words13320

Comments