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Ms. Cote

English 11CP

Peer-Evaluation

What is a peer-evaluation?

An evaluation in which you will use specific criteria to assess the work of your peers.

Below are the specific criteria, and questions, that you will be using to evaluate your peers’ essays:

Peer-Evaluation Rubric

CATEGORY

4 - Exceeds Standards

3 - Meets Standards

2 - Approaching Standards

1 - Below Standards

Score

Introduction

The student uses a hook that grabs the attention of others and piques their interest in the controversial issue. The student introduces the issue and, in a very clear and understandable way, states his/her position on the issue. The student briefly summarizes 3 or more pieces of supporting evidence.

The student uses a hook that grabs the attention of others but fails to pique their interest in the controversial issue. The student introduces the issue and states his/her position on the issue. However, his/her position on the issue is vague or difficult to understand. The student briefly summarizes only 3 pieces of supporting evidence.

The student uses a hook that fails to grab the attention of others. The student introduces the controversial issue but does not state his/her position on the issue. The student briefly summarizes less than 3 pieces of supporting evidence.

The student does not use a hook. The student does not introduce the controversial issue or state any kind of position on the issue. The student does not summarize his/her supporting evidence.

Body

The student uses 3, or more, pieces of supporting evidence to justify his/her position on the controversial issue. Each piece of evidence is briefly introduced, and how it justifies the student's position, is explained in great detail. The evidence is arranged by order of importance (least important to most important).

The student uses only 3 pieces of supporting evidence to justify his/her position on the controversial issue. Each piece of evidence is briefly introduced, and how it justifies the student's position, is explained. The evidence is arranged by order of importance (least important to most important), but the arrangement may not be appropriate.

The student uses less than 3 pieces of supporting evidence to justify his/her position on the controversial issue. Each piece of evidence is briefly introduced, but how it justifies the student's position is not fully explained. The evidence is not arranged in any particular order.

The student does not use any supporting evidence to justify his/her position on the controversial issue.

Transitions

The student uses well-worded phrases to shift seamlessly between his/her explanations of the supporting evidence for his/her position on the controversial issue.

The student uses brief phrases to shift between his/her explanations of the supporting evidence for his/her position on the controversial issue.

The student uses brief phrases to shift between his/her explanations of the supporting evidence for his/her position on the controversial issue. However, the phrases do not appear to create any real connections between the pieces of evidence.

The student does not use any phrases to shift between his/her explanations of the supporting evidence for his/her position on the controversial issue.

Conclusion

The student restates his/her position on the controversial issue and briefly summarizes the supporting evidence. The author closes with a final thought that encourages others to further consider the student's position.

The student restates his/her position on the controversial issue and briefly summarizes the supporting evidence.

The student repeats, word for word, the position on the controversial issue that he/she has in the introduction.

The student's argument does not have a conclusion; it just ends.

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