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JAMES K. POLK

"Polk is Mr. Truman's nomination for the most neglected President in our history." He was our first dark-horse candidate, Mr. Truman points out. "Polk said plainly that he would not run for a second term. He promised to fulfill all his commitments within his first four years."

No President ever had a more hostile congress. Calhoun and Webster were in the senate. They never gave him a moments peace. Yet, despite this, no President until our time, succeeded in putting on the books so many vital general laws. He completed the annexation of Texas, solved the touchy Oregon-Canada problem, settled long-standing tariff disputes and established a new efficient treasury system..

When he got in to border troubles with Mexico, Polk made himself unpopular by offering to pay $45,000,000 for the disputed area. Even after the War, Polk saw to it that we paid Mexico for what we had won. In Polk's administration we added one million square miles of new territory, including New Mexico, Arizona, and California. Under Polk we became a MAJOR NATION."

From "Harry Truman Picks Our Four Most Underrated Presidents" by John and June Robbins

POLKFAMOUS OF THE LINE

From "HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF TEXAS AS TOLD BY COUNTY NAMES." by Z.T. Fulmore - 1915

James Knox Polk was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, November 2, 1795. His parents moved to Tennessee in 1806 where he was reared and educated. In 1814, he entered the University of North. Carolina at Chappel Hill and was graduated from that institution in 1818. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1820. In 1823 he was elected to the Legislature of Tennessee. In 1825 he was elected to the United States Congress and was a member of the body for four­teen years. For two years he was Speaker of the Lower House.

On the expiration of his Congressional term he became the candidate of the Democratic party for Governor of Tennessee and was elected by the twenty-five hundred majority. He made two more efforts for re-election but was defeated both times. In May 1844 he was nominated for the President at the Conven­tion held at Baltimore and was elected. His administration was a successful one. The annexation of Texas and the Mexican War soon

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