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  • 3.

    Principles of Aviation Security Management Systems Positive Leadership Culture Data-based Decision Making Involvement of Management

  • 4.

    Audits and Inspections Internal Audits Risk Assessment Matrix Synergy with ICAO and National Requirements and Inspections

5. Practical Applications Best Practices Proper Handling of Sensitive Security Information (SSI) Non-regulatory Security Practices that Make Sense and Diminish Risk Operating in Unfamiliar Environments

6. Security Technologies Cost Benefit Emerging Technologies

  • 7.

    Threats Threats to Aircraft Threats to Airports

  • 8.

    Case Studies and Practical Exercise Audit of Aviation Entity Application of SMS Principles

Course Duration: 4.0 Days

Course No.

Dates

AVSEC 09-1

21 – 24 Oct 2008

AVSEC 09-2

26 – 29 May 2009

AVSEC 10-1

1 – 4 Sep 2009

Tuition $ 1350 $ 1350 TBA

PLEASE VISIT HTTP://VITErBI.USC.EdU/AVIATION FOr THE MOST CUrrENT INFOrMATION.

THrEAT ANd ErrOr MANAGEMENT dEVELOPMENT (TEM)

Threat and Error Management (TEM) Development is being imple- mented by operators throughout the world. This course is designed to train those who wish to develop and teach a TEM course within their own organizations. Taught by a leader in TEM development, this course provides an applied, practical approach to explaining TEM principles. Attendees will gain sufficient knowledge to customize a TEM course within their respective organizations.

The course begins with an introduction to “threats,” which are those things that can increase operational complexity and if not handled properly, can decrease safety margins. Flight operations examples include black hole non-precision approaches, white out conditions and low light conditions, icing, improper use of automation, weather, ter- rain, mechanical malfunctions and distractions. Maintenance examples are fatigue, poor lighting, unclear work directives, time pressures and uncompleted work that is handed over to another shift. Examples pertaining to cabin crew members are cabin fires — both hidden and overt, command interruptions, disruptive passengers, rushing and malfunctioning cabin equipment.

Objectives: To provide class participants with sufficient knowledge to develop a TEM course within their respective organizations.

Who should attend: This course has been carefully designed to appeal to those who are responsible for developing a Threat and Error Manage- ment program within their organization. It will also provide a detailed understanding of TEM to those who, while not actively developing TEM courseware, wish to improve their professional skills through greater knowledge of TEM.

Course outline:

  • 1.

    Introduction to Threats and Errors Threats and Threat Recognition Error Avoidance and Trapping

  • 2.

    ABCD’s of Threat and Error Management Assessing Threats and Acknowledging Errors Barriers to Error and How to Effectively Build Them Communications and its Relationship to Threat and Error Management

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