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43

Washington

2313

67

2380 (54.0%)

Idaho

165

12

177 ( 4.0%)

Montana

473

21

494 (11.2%)

North Dakota

902

38

940 (21.4%)

Minnesota

395

21

416 ( 9.4%)

4148 (96.4%)

159 (3.6%)

4407

number of truck crossings made in 1994. Additional information for each of the 28 crossings, obtained from a variety of sources, is shown in Appendix B.

These six crossings account for three-quarters of the western crossborder movement. Figure 4-2a shows truck flows across the six major border crossings. Also shown is the truck flow across the Manitoba-Ontario border, based on Manitoba Department of Highways and Transportation data. There is ten times as much truck traffic crossing the U.S.-Canada western border than moves between western and eastern Canada via the Trans-Canada Highway.

United States

Canada

British Columbia Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario

Source: Appendix B

2443

81

2524 (58.6%)

356

13

369 ( 8.6%)

370

15

385 ( 8.9%)

822

50

872 (20.2%)

157

0

157 ( 3.6%)

Table 4-1

4148 (96.4%)

159 (3.6%)

4307

1992 Truck Crossings of the Western Border (in Both Directions) (Average Daily Number of Trucks)

Jurisdiction

Other Crossings

Total

(26)

(54)

Study Crossing (28)

s

4.2.1 Blaine-Pacific Highway

This is the highest volume crossing on the western border, averaging 1820 trucks per day in 1994 (two-way), which grew 23 percent since 1992. Trucking movements at this crossing are concentrated on traffic moving along the West Coast. Principal southbound movements are wood, lumber, paper and printed material, metals and metal products, and manufactured goods. Principal northbound movements include produce (particularly in winter), general freight and some lumber. Many of the northbound produce-haul trucks (principally five-axle, reefer- equipped, tractor-semitrailers) return empty to the south. About 15 percent of the trucks at this crossing handle containers moving between Seattle and Vancouver (between the respective ports, railroads, and shippers). Two-thirds of the northbound movements are conducted by Canadian- registered vehicles.

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