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Truck characteristics at this crossing are primarily controlled by U.S. regulations, and in particular those emanating from Washington, Oregon and California, and the Federal law. Being on I-5, this crossing is subject to the ISTEA freeze of 105,500 pounds GVW and 68-foot cargo-carrying unit length for tractor double-trailer combinations. Triple-trailer combinations are not permitted in Washington or British Columbia.

There are several relatively unique truck configurations operating on the crossing. These result from the combined effects of the governing TS&W regulations, commodity handlings and intermodal operations present in the region. Examples include: five-, six-, and seven-axle truck trailers, six-, seven-, and eight-axle tractor-semitrailers, and specialized container-hauling equipment.

The BN routes traffic through the same crossing. Substantial growth in southbound rail traffic through this crossing has occurred in recent years as the BN has accessed increasing amounts of British Columbia lumber traffic destined for the North Central U.S. Historically, this traffic tended to travel via Canadian railway routings, crossing into the United States in Minnesota.

4.2.2 Sumas-Huntington

This is the fourth highest volume crossing on the western border, averaging 359 trucks per day in 1994 (two-way flow)--28 percent higher than in 1992. There has been rapid growth of industrial activity in the vicinity of this crossing, particularly on the Canadian side of the border. Much of the traffic through this crossing moves between U.S. Route 9 and I-5 through relatively circuitous routing on two-lane State highways (particularly Highway 546). More than two-thirds of the northbound movements are conducted by Canadian-registered vehicles.

Truck characteristics at this crossing are primarily controlled by U.S. regulations, and in particular those of Washington, Oregon, and California, and the Federal law. Being on NN and NHS, the U.S. Route 9 crossing is subject to the ISTEA freeze of 68 feet for the box length of double cargo-carrying unit combinations.

There are several relatively unique truck configurations operating on the crossing. These result from the combined effects of the governing TS&W regulations, commodity handlings and intermodal operations present in the region. Examples include five-, six-, and seven-axle truck trailers and six-, seven-, and eight-axle tractor-semitrailers. The BN exchanges traffic with the Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways at this crossing.

4.2.3 Eastport-Kinsgate

This is the sixth highest volume crossing on the western border, averaging 194 trucks per day in 1994 (two-way flow)--18 percent higher than in 1992. Southbound traffic is dominated by truckload movements of building materials, peat moss, fertilizer, meat, and livestock (principally destined for Pasco, Washington). Most of these trucks would return empty to Canada or would

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