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B-11

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    Southbound Traffic:

    • -

      FY 1992 = 248 trucks/day

      • #

        FY 1994 = 341 trucks/day

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      Metal products, chemicals, agriculture machinery, lumber, cement, livestock, clothing, furniture, grain, meat

      • #

        Traffic has grown from 30-50 trucks/day in 1977 to 300-500 trucks/day in 1995.

      • #

        Major reason for recent growth is the devaluation of Canadian $; southbound car traffic is down while southbound truck traffic is up.

      • #

        Truck traffic is growing much faster than rail.

      • #

        Lumber trucks and peat moss to Texas and Arizona; paper rolls, raw commodities, wood pulp in bails, potash mainly to Minnesota.

      • #

        About 10 percent of southbound trucks are empty versus 40 percent empty northbound.

      • +

        Southbound cattle movements through the Emerson Scale are destined for Dakota City and Sioux Falls and Des Moines, Iowa. Cattle is always moved southbound, with the cattle trucks returning empty.

      • +

        Infrequently, loaded containers are moved southbound via Emerson (usually in-bond)

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    Northbound Traffic:

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      CY 1992 = 166 trucks/day

      • *

        CY 1993 = 219 trucks/day

      • *

        CY 1994 = 325 trucks/day ^ CY 1994 = 328 trucks/day [113 U.S./215 Canadian]

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      Produce, consumer goods

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      The difference between southbound and northbound movements in 1992 occurred because many of the empty northbound trucks utilize the Emerson East crossing to avoid processing time at this crossing. This practice has now stopped, with most traffic routing through this crossing.

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        Factors which have helped to create this large increase in northbound traffic are: (1) about January 1994, because of a bridge restriction at Emerson East, effectively all border brokerage services moved to the Emerson site; (2) at about the same time, U.S. Customs designated only selected locations as commercial Points of Entry (Emerson being one; Noyes not being), meaning fuller inspection services.

      • *

        Canadian Customs conducted a special survey between April 3 and April 7, 1995 for northbound traffic through Emerson. 1942 commercial vehicles crossed the border during the study period. 264 of these were randomly selected, and showed the following:

Truck-load (TL) traffic

92

LTL traffic

11

Flatbed traffic

31

Bulk loads

18

Empty

104

Other

8

Total

264

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    30-40 percent of northbound trucks are empty (roughly supported by the above special survey).

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      50 percent of northbound trucks through Emerson are Manitoba carriers; the remainder are mainly from

North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ohio.

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    Roughly 5 containers/day (usually 20-foot boxes) are moved northbound from Crookston, Minnesota,

through Emerson, to Winnipeg, manitoba for westbound shipment via the CN or CP.

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    Products originating in Mexico and destined for Manitoba are typically hauled by North Dakota carriers specializing in produce haul , such as Brysen, PRO.

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      Other northbound produce movement is estimated as three loads per week from California by California haulers, none are from New Mexico or Arizona, not many from Texas, and six loads per week from Florida.

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      Most of the produce haulers leave Manitoba empty.

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      Roughly 40 percent of Emerson scale traffic are U.S. trucks; 60 percent are Canadian.

@ The truck traffic on I-29 through the Joliette Scale, which operates less than 24 hours per day, was

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