X hits on this document

PDF document

RFID Technologies in Neonatal Care - page 1 / 8

89 views

0 shares

1 downloads

0 comments

1 / 8

White Paper by Intel Corporation, LG CNS, ECO Inc, and onJu Christian Hospital

RFID Technologies in Neonatal Care

U s i n g m o b i l e d e v i c e s b a s e d o n I n t e l ® M o b i l Media echnology, radio frequency identification (RFID), and wireless networks, Intel worked with two technology associates to pilot an electronic neonatal healthcare system in a Korean hospital. The system automatically captures records of infant care, and gives families better access to new-baby information. The hospital was so pleased with the project that it moved seamlessly from pilot to full product immediately after the pilot phase. e

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

To provide timely, accurate information to families about infants in neonatal care and reduce the chance of mother-baby mix-ups, Intel led a pilot project to automate the neonatal records system at WonJu Christian Hospital in WonJu, Korea. Intel, working with LG CNS and ECO Inc., developed a digital healthcare system for the hospital that uses mobile devices based on Intel® Mobile Media Technology, radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, and wireless networks. The system provides infant record automation and capture, mobile point-of-care (POC) abilities, information sharing for relatives, and an RFID mother-baby match-up system.

Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sharing Data with Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Data Entry and Infant Record Automation . . . . . . . 2 Addressing Mother-Baby Mix-ups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

As hospitals worldwide move toward paperless systems, solutions that move medical records to digital forms are gaining attention. These solutions must address safety, security, and operational efficiency, and can enhance clinical decision making and efficiency.

The Solution at WonJu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 How the System Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Overall System Performance and ROI. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Estimated ROI of Minimized Legal Exposure . . . . . . 6 Estimated Patient Safety ROI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Overall Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Authors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

One issue hospitals face is meeting the needs of the mother and immediate family for quicker information on newborns in neonatal care units, where babies are sent when they need extra care. Another problem is mother-baby mix-ups, in which the wrong infant is given to a mother, sometimes for a few minutes, sometimes for a longer period. Such a mistake can be traumatic for all parties, and may trigger lawsuits.

Joseph Dalton, PhD Intel Corporation

In-Hyung Kim LG CNS

Baek-Keun Lim MD, PhD onJu Christian Hospital

September 2005

Benefits for hospitals that implement an automated digital hospital approach may include:

  • Improved patient care and safety

  • Reduced systems and human-based errors

  • Estimated return on investment (ROI) of between 150 to 250

percent as capital costs diminish incrementally over time

In the Korean hospital pilot program, which was quickly adopted into production, Intel implemented electronic changes in two areas of the hospital—data sharing and electronic patient identification. The success of this pilot showcases Intel’s investment in the future of healthcare—the integrated digital hospital.

Document info
Document views89
Page views111
Page last viewedTue Dec 06 08:49:06 UTC 2016
Pages8
Paragraphs178
Words3596

Comments