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Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Also available online. NIH Pub No. 99-580. Language: English. Abstract: This fact sheet presents an overview of vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma, acoustic neurinoma, or acoustic neurilemoma) is a benign, usually slow- growing tumor that develops from the balance and hearing nerves supplying the inner ear. Unilateral/asymmetric hearing loss and/or tinnitus and loss of balance/dizziness are early signs of a vestibular schwannoma. The fact sheet discusses the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this disorder, and lists referrals for additional information. Subject Category: Hearing. Balance. Descriptors: Vestibular Schwannoma. Vestibular System Tumor. Acoustic Neuroma. Acoustic Neurinoma. Acoustic Neurilemoma. Balance Disorder. Inner Ear Disorder. Dizziness. Hearing Loss. Deafness.

91.

Healthy People 2010 and Healthy Hearing.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: NIDCD. Bethesda, MD. 2002. 4p. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: English. Abstract: Healthy People 2010 is a program led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help all Americans improve their overall health. Healthy People 2010 serves as a guide for individuals, groups, and entire communities to set up programs and activities that help people learn the necessary steps for good health and disease prevention. This brochure identifies the Healthy People 2010 objectives for reducing the problems caused by hearing loss. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Healthy People 2010. Health Policy. Health Objectives. Hearing.

92.

Phonological Awareness: One Key to The Reading

Proficiency of Deaf Children.

Author(s): Nielsen, D. C., Luetke-Stahlman, B. Source: American Annals of the Deaf. 147(3): 11-19. July 2002. Availability: Available from Gallaudet University Press. 800 Florida Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20002. (202)651-5488 (Voice/TTY); (202)651-5489 (Fax). E-mail: valencia.simmons@gallaudet.edu. Website: http://gupress.gallaudet.edu/annals/. Language: English. Abstract: The authors of this article are making a case for the value of both hearing and deaf children developing phonological awareness to reach their potential as readers. They discuss relevant terms-phonological awareness, phonological processes, and phonics-to help readers with the research review which covers: the typical stages in the acquisition of phonological awareness; and phonological awareness and deafness. The authors also offer suggestions for phonological awareness assessment with a recommendation that deaf educators and speech pathologists use recently developed formal and informal measures of phonological awareness for setting goals and objectives for evaluating skills of deaf students and planning instructions for these students. Research about the facilitation of phonological awareness and its application is explained also. Subject Category: Language. Hearing. Descriptors: Deaf Children. Communication. Phonological Awareness. Phonics. Phonological Processes. Speech-Language Pathology. Special Education. Deaf Education. Deafness. Hard-of-Hearing Children. Teaching Resource. Parent Resource.

93.

Medical Aspects of Hearing Loss.

Author(s): Northern, J. L., Downs, M. P. Source: Hearing in Children (5th ed). Northern, J.L.; Downs, M.P. Philadelphia, PA. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2002. pp. 91-124. ISBN: 0-683-30764-9 (hardcover).

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Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 223-2300. Fax: (301) 223-2400. Website: www.lww.com. Language: English. Abstract: This chapter from a text on hearing in children discusses the medical aspects of hearing loss. It begins with a discussion of disorders associated with hearing loss such as conditions of the external ear and ear canal, bony growths in the external auditory canal, inflammatory conditions, and perforations of the tympanic membrane; deformities of the lip and palate; Down syndrome; and acquired hearing loss from ototoxic drugs, a perilymph fistula, a temporal bone fracture, and noise exposure. This discussion is followed by a description of childhood infections associated with hearing loss (e.g., meningitis, congenital syphilis, and cytomegalovirus) and a discussion of other medical conditions that can result in hearing loss (e.g., persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, Rh incompatibility, autoimmune disease, acoustic neuroma, malformations of the external ear and canal, and congenital middle and inner ear malformations). The chapter also presents information on genetics, including chromosome defects, patterns of inheritance, the genetics of deafness, and genetic counseling. It concludes with a discussion of the team management of children with hearing impairment. 13 figures. 5 tables. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Infants. Children. Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Ear Infections. Ear Canal. Eardrum Perforation. Congenital Anomalies. Autism. Infection. Congenital Deafness. Genetics. Genetic Counseling. Patient Care Management. Patient Care Team.

94.

Hearing Screening in Children.

Author(s): Northern, J. L., Downs, M. P. Source: Hearing in Children (5th ed). Northern, J.L.; Downs, M.P. Philadelphia, PA. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2002. pp. 259-300. ISBN: 0-683-30764-9 (hardcover). Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 223-2300. Fax: (301) 223-2400. Website: www.lww.com. Language: English. Abstract: This chapter from a text on hearing in children focuses on hearing screening in children. It outlines the principles of hearing screening, describes screening test performance characteristics, explains decision matrix analysis, and distinguishes between prevalence and incidence. This is followed by a discussion of neonatal and infant hearing screening; principles and guidelines for early hearing detection and intervention programs as presented in a Joint Committee on Infant Hearing Screening year 2000 position statement; universal newborn screening; and risk indicators for deafness such as asphyxia, craniofacial anomalies, and in utero infections known by the acronym TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and other bacterial infections). Other topics include screening for hearing impairment at birth through 6 months, 7 months through 2 years, 3 through 5 years, and 5 through 18 years; screening for communicative disorders and otitis media; acoustic immittance screening; auditory screening of the developmentally delayed child; and screening follow-up issues. 10 figure. 8 tables. Subject Category: Hearing. Speech. Descriptors: Infants. Children. Hearing Loss. Hearing Evaluation. Guidelines. Risk Factors. Screening. Communication Disorders. Otitis Media.

95.

Otitis Media.

Author(s): Northern, J. L., Downs, M. P. Source: Hearing in Children (5th ed). Northern, J.L.; Downs, M.P. Philadelphia, PA. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2002. pp. 65-89. ISBN: 0-683-30764-9 (hardcover). Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 223-2300. Fax: (301) 223-2400. Website: www.lww.com. Language: English. Abstract: This chapter from a text on hearing in children provides an overview of otitis media. This inflammation of the middle ear, which is the most common childhood disease, creates a mild to moderate degree of conductive hearing loss by compromising the air conduction sound pathway. The chapter considers the economic impact of otitis media on national health expenditures, discusses the pathophysiology and

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