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bridging process; phonemic awareness; reading comprehension; and American Sign Language development/written English. Subject Category: Hearing. Language. Descriptors: Literacy Strategies. Deaf Communication. Deaf Children. Bilingual Signing. American Sign Language. Children With Hearing Loss. Deaf Communication. Educator Resource. Parent Resource. Language Skills Development.

164.

Auditory-Visual and Auditory-Only Perception of Phonetic

Contrasts in Children.

Author(s): Eisenberg, L. S., Schaefer Martinez, A., Boothroyd, A. Source: The Volta Review. 103(4): 327-346. 2003. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Availability: Available from the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Publications Department, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007-2778. Voice/TTY: (202) 337-5220. Web site: http://www.agbell.org. PRICE: $24.95 plus shipping and handling. Language: English. Abstract: In this monograph the authors report on a test developed to define auditory-perceptual capacity in young children with hearing loss. Called the On-line Imitative Test of Speech Pattern Contrast Perception (On-line IMSPAC), this test assesses the ability of young children to convey phonologically significant contrastive information through imitation consonant-vowel monosyllables presented by hearing plus lip reading and by hearing alone. Preliminary data are presented from 30 children assessed on the On-line IMSPAC-10 children with normal hearing; 10 children with hearing loss ranging from 38.3 dB HL to 100 dB HL (children using hearing aids; and 10 children with profound hearing loss (children using cochlear implants). Their ages ranged from 2.75 years to 7.9 years, with a mean age of 4.9 years. Performance scores were shown to decrease with increased hearing loss. The preliminary results demonstrate the clinical utility of a phonetic-level, imitative test of auditory capacity for children as young as 2-3 years of age. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Infant Hearing Loss. Deafness. Auditory Perception. Hearing Research. Hearing Test. Hearing Screening.

165.

Sound Advice by Steve Epstein, M.D.

Author(s): Epstein, S. Source: Washington, Dc. 2003. Volta Voices. Availability: Available from Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007. 202-337-5220; TTY: 202-337-5221; FAX: 202-337-8314. Web site: www.agbell.org. Language: English. Abstract: Dr. Steve Epstein, M.D. gives advice to a Meniere's disease patient who is experiencing vertigo that has been unresponsive to medications, and is considering the Meniett device suggested by his otologist as a possible solution to the problem. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Meniere's Disease. Vertigo. Treatment Device. Balance Disorder.

166.

Sound Advice by Steve Epstein, M.D.

Author(s): Epstein, S. Source: Volta Voices. 10(5): 30. September-October 2003. Availability: Available from Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007. (202) 337- 5220; (202) 337-5221 (TTY); Fax: (202) 337-8314. Website: www.agbell.org. Language: English. Abstract: Dr. Epstein answers a reader's question about his daughter's diagnosis of CHARGE Association-specifically, how such a diagnosis would affect the child, and the best way to treat the child's hearing loss. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Loss. Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Hearing Impairment. Parent Resource. Middle Ear Problem. Hearing Loss Treatment. Cochlear Implant.

167.

Etiologies and Treatment Options for Sudden Sensorineural

Hearing Loss.

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Author(s): Fayad, J. N., De La Cruz, A. Source: The Hearing Review. December 2003. 10(13):16-17. Availability: Available from CurAnt Communications Inc., Publisher. 6701 Center Drive West, Suite 450, Los Angeles, CA 90045-1535. (310) 642- 4400. Web site: www.hearingreview.com. Language: English. Abstract: This article, written by two otologists from the House Ear Institute, explains to readers the causes and treatment strategies for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), described as a common medical emergency affecting 5 to 20 individuals per 100,000 annually. Some causes include viral infections, head trauma, ototoxic drugs, autoimmune and vascular disorders, as well as development abnormalities and idiopathic disorders like Meniere's disease and multiple sclerosis. This article provides an overview of the etiologies associated with SSNHL and the medical treatment options that are available. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Ear Disorder. Hearing Loss. Deafness. Hearing Loss Therapy. Professional Resource.

168.

As Candidacy Criteria Loosen Up, Use of Cochlear Implants

Grows Rapidly.

Author(s): Florian, J. Source: The Hearing Journal. April 2003. 56(4). p. 23-29. Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 345 Hudson Street, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10014. (212) 886-1244. Fax: (212) 886- 1209. E-mail: hj@lww.com. Web site: www.thehearingjournal.com. Language: English. Abstract: When the cochlear implant was introduced in the 1970s, it was primarily considered a communication option for postlingually deafened adults. This article describes how, as the technology is advancing, the criteria are changing for potential candidates. Candidates for the device may now include young children as well as individuals with lesser degrees of hearing loss, including those who may also wear a hearing aid. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Cochlear Implants. Communication Options. Hearing Loss. Deafness. Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Hearing Impaired Persons. Deaf Persons. Hard of Hearing Persons. Postlingual Deafness. Prelingual Deafness. Late Deafened Adults. Acquired Deafness.

169.

Sailing Out of the Windless Sea of Monosyllables: The Use of

Speech Perception Tests in Aural Rehabilitation.

Author(s): Flynn, M. C. Source: The Hearing Review. 10(4): 24-30,78. April 2003. Availability: Available from CurAnt Communications Inc., Publisher. 6701 Center Drive West, Suite 450, Los Angeles, CA 90045-1535. (310) 642- 4400. (310) 641-0831 (Fax). Web site: www.hearingreview.com. Language: English. Abstract: The author explores the use of new measures of speech perception now in development that could expand the utility of speech perception testing through examination of the use of contextual effects and a measurement of meta-linguistic proficiency. The author sees these new measures as helpful to the identification of functional goals and the measurement of program benefit. References included. Subject Category: Speech. Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Research. Speech Perception. Aural Rehabilitation. Communication. Deafness. Hearing Impairment.

170.

Maximizing Speech Understanding and Listening Comfort in

Noise.

Author(s): Flynn, M. C. Source: The Hearing Review. July 2003. 10;7:50-3. Availability: Send correspondence to Mark C. Flynn, PhD. Oticon A/S, Strandvejen 58, Hellerup, DK 2900, Denmark. E-mail: mcf@oticon.dk. Language: English. Abstract: The author of this article discusses the effect of background noise interference on hearing aid wearers. He focuses specifically on addressing three issues essential to providing optimal speech understanding in noise, and ensuring listening comfort: the features of a prescriptive rationale that will affect speech understanding; how people with hearing loss perceives and understand speech in noise; and how to make listening more comfortable and natural when speech is not present. References included.

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