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Source: The American Annals of the Deaf. 148(4):308-14. Fall 2003. Availability: Available from Gallaudet University Press Denison House. 800 Florida Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20002. (202) 651-5488 (Voice/TTY; Fax: (202) 651-5489. E-mail: gupress@gallaudet.edu. Language: English. Abstract: The language effects on repair strategies employed by seven bilingual deaf children (native signers who also used spoken language) was examined. During two sessions-one conducted in sign language and the other in spoken language-each child described a picture. The examiner stopped the child twice to request clarification. The children's responses to the requests were coded into seven repair strategies. Results indicated that language mode significantly influenced repair strategy behavior: In sign language, the children used a greater frequency, variety, and level of strategies. The position of the clarification request also had an effect: Later in the sequence, the children used more advanced strategies. It was assumed that these native signers evidenced a higher language level in sign, which allowed them to use more advanced communicational strategies in sign than in spoken language. This performance gap should be considered in intervention. Subject Category: Hearing. Speech. Language. Descriptors: Bilingual Deaf Children. American Sign Language. Oral- Deaf Communication. Deaf Children. Children With Hearing Loss. Sing Language Level. Communication Strategies.

207.

They Said It Couldn't Be Done: NIH's Commitment to Basic

Research Brings Cochlear Implants to Life.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: NIDCD. Bethesda, MD. 2003. 24p. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: English. Abstract: The technology behind cochlear implants is changing rapidly. With advancements in technology and continued follow-up research with people who have already received implants, researchers are evaluating new opportunities and additional possible candidates for cochlear implants. This brochure discusses issues related to cochlear implants and the institute's role in development and research of the cochlear implant. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Cochlear Implants. Research. Hearing Assistive Devices. Clinical Trials. Hearing Loss. Deafness.

208.

NIDCD: What We Do.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: NIDCD. Bethesda, MD. 2004. 12p. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: English. Abstract: NIDCD supports scientific discovery. To understand both normal processes and those processes that disrupt or devastate human communication systems, NIDCD supports a wide range of research approaches and more than two dozen strategies. This publication contains details about the Institute's programs and activities. Subject Category: Speech. Language. Voice. Hearing. Taste. Smell. Balance. Descriptors: Research Training. Grants and Funding Opportunities. Deafness. Communication Disorders. Information Resources. Organizations. Professional Organizations. Voluntary Organizations. Advocacy. Speech Language Pathology. Otolaryngology. Sensory Disabilities. Hearing Loss. Conferences. Voice Disorders.

209.

WISE EARS! Tips: Hearing Matters-Protect It.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

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Source: NIDCD. Bethesda, MD. 2004. Single sheet. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: English. Abstract: Noise-induced hearing loss is defined as hearing loss caused by exposure to harmful sounds, either very loud impulse sound(s) or repeated exposure to sounds over 90-decibel level over an extended period of time that damage the sensitive structures of the inner ear. This fact sheet offers tips for preventing noise-induced hearing loss. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. Hearing Loss. Workplace Health. Hearing Protection. Children's Health.

210.

What to Do If Your Baby's Screening Reveals a Possible

Hearing Problem.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 2003. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Also available online. NIH Pub No. 03-5338. Language: English. Abstract: This fact sheet explains to parents the steps to take should a screening reveal that their child may have hearing loss. The document discusses follow-up examination with an audiologist, early intervention processes and services, hearing devices, and communication and assistive communication technologies. The fact sheet also covers follow- up for the child who tests as hearing. A follow-up checklist and a list of referrals for additional information is included. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Newborn Screening. Newborn Hearing Test. Newborn Follow-up Evaluation. Infant Hearing Loss. Pediatric Deafness. Deaf Children. Parent Education. Communication. Speech and Language.

211.

When a Newborn Doesn't Pass the Hearing Screening: How

Medical and Other Health Professionals Can Help Increase the Number of Infants Who Return for a Follow-Up Evaluation.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 2003. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Also available online. NIH Pub No. 98-4291. Language: English. Abstract: This fact sheet discusses the importance of follow-up and intervention for newborns who are identified as deaf or hard-of-hearing, following screening at birth. The fact sheet addresses effective ways that health professionals can intervene to ensure parents of hearing-impaired infants follow-up for their child's care. The fact sheet also details what parents should be told before leaving the hospital and lists additional resources to assist parents of a child diagnosed with hearing loss. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Newborn Screening. Newborn Hearing Test. Newborn Follow-up Evaluation. Infant Hearing Loss. Pediatric Deafness. Deaf Children. Parent Education. Professional Education.

212.

Auditory Neuropathy: Quick Facts.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 2003.

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