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Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Also available online. NIH Pub No. 03-5343. Language: English. Abstract: This fact sheet presents a basic overview about auditory neuropathy, a hearing disorder in which sound enters the inner ear normally but the transmission of signals from the inner ear to the brain is impaired. Auditory neuropathy can affect people of all ages, from infancy through adulthood, as well as some deaf or hearing-impaired individuals. The fact sheet covers the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this disorder, and lists referrals for additional information. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Auditory Neuropathy. Hearing Disorder. Hearing Impairment. Inner Ear Problem.

213.

NIDCD and Your Career.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: NIDCD. Bethesda, MD. 2004. 12p. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: English. Abstract: This publication describes specific research training opportunities available in more than two dozen disciplines. These opportunities encompass basic, clinical and translational research. Subject Category: Speech. Language. Voice. Hearing. Taste. Smell. Balance. Descriptors: Research Training. Grants and Funding Opportunities. Deafness. Communication Disorders. Information Resources. Organizations. Professional Organizations. Voluntary Organizations. Advocacy. Speech Language Pathology. Otolaryngology. Sensory Disabilities. Hearing Loss. Conferences. Voice Disorders.

214.

More About Cochlear Implants.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 2003. Availability: Available from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Also available online. NIH Pub No. 03-5360A. Language: English. Abstract: This fact sheet presents a basic overview of cochlear implants including, the history of the cochlear implant, how cochlear implants work, who can benefit from this type of assistive hearing device (children and/or adults), and how patients can finance implantation surgery. A case study is used to demonstrate a specific situation in which choosing a cochlear implant was appropriate. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Disorder. Hearing Disorder Treatment. Hearing Assistive Devices. Deafness. Hard-of-Hearing. Cochlear Implantation.

215.

Newborn Screening In the 21st Century: Current Status and

Considerations.

Author(s): Nehring, W. M. Source: The Exceptional Parent. 33(4): 53-56. April 2003. Availability: Available from Exceptional Parent. 65 East Route 4, River Edge, NJ 07661. (201)489-4111; (201)489-0074 (Fax). Web site: http://www.eparent.com/. Language: English. Abstract: Questions about newborn screening and follow-up are being considered by both medical professional and the legal sectors in many states. This paper from the Health Promotion and Prevention Committee,

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American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR)of June 2002, serves to raise awareness among AAMR members on the issues, disseminate information for informed decision-making among members, and initiate discussion among members in relation to this topic. This particular is the sixth of a series that began in the October, 2002 issue of Exceptional Parent (EP) and continuing throughout 2003. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Newborn Screening. Infant Deafness. Infant Hearing Loss. Newborn Screening Policy. Newborn Screening Research.

216.

Tinnitus and Aging.

Author(s): Newman, C. W., Sandridge, S. A. Source: Tinnitus Today-Journal of the American Tinnitus Association. 28(2): 8-10. June 2003. Availability: Available from American Tinnitus Association (ATA). P.O. Box 5, Portland, OR 97207-0005. (800) 634-8978 or (503) 248-9985. Fax: (503) 248-0024. E-mail: tinnitus@ata.org. Website: www.ata.org. Language: English. Abstract: Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound when no external sound is present. For some tinnitus can be a life-altering condition. Thirty percent of people age 55 and older report tinnitus-a higher percentage than in the general population. This article discusses two questionnaires that can help individuals discover just how much of a problem tinnitus and hearing loss may be for them. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Tinnitus. Aging. Hearing Disorder. Tinnitus Diagnosis. Hearing Loss. Hearing Impairment.

217.

Hearing Status, Language Modality, and Young Children's

Communicative and Linguistic Behavior.

Author(s): Nicholas, J. G., Geers, A. E. Source: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education. 8(4): 422-437. Fall 2003. Availability: Available from Oxford University Press, Journals Customer Service, 2001 Evans Road, Cary, NC 27513. (800) 852-7323 or (919) 677-0977. Fax: (919) 677-1714. E-mail: jnlorders@oup-usa.org. Language: English. Abstract: This study examined early pragmatic skill development in a group of 38 children with severe or profound hearing loss between 1 and 4 years of age who were enrolled in a simultaneous communication (SC) approach to language learning. Both their use of intentionally communicative acts and their use of language were studied in an analysis of 30-min play sessions between a child and the primary caregiver. Results were compared with previously published data from two age- matched groups: 38 deaf children who were enrolled in oral communication (OC) programs and 84 normally hearing (NH) children. All groups showed a significant improvement with age in the communicative behaviors measured; therefore, the overall trend was toward growth-in all age groups-even when the rates of growth differed. By age 3 years, a pattern of communicative function use had emerged in all three groups. Patterns exhibited by deaf children in the SC and OC groups were similar to each other and to younger NH children but dissimilar to NH age mates. Although the use of signed input by normally hearing parents and teachers did not serve to ameliorate the profound effects of hearing loss on communication development in SC children, it did provide some early advantages. The children in SC groups did not exhibit an advantage over children in OC groups in their overall frequency of communication or the breadth of their vocabulary but they began using words earlier and used mature communicative functions significantly more often. Although children in the OC groups did not exhibit a significant advantage in the overall amount of speech used, they showed an advantage in the breadth of their spoken vocabulary in a conversational setting. Implications for early intervention programming are discussed. Subject Category: Hearing. Language. Speech. Descriptors: Infant Hearing Loss. Infant Deafness. Speech Development. Language Development. Language Development Skills. Early Childhood Deafness. Infant Communication. Linguistic Behavior. Speech-Language Development Skills. Hearing Impairment. Hard-of- Hearing Infants.

218.

Achieving Goals! DEAFinitely Dynamic.

Author(s): Northwest Technical Assistance Center. Source: Postsecondary Education Programs Network (PEPNet).

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