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1-58890-228-5. PRICE: $59 plus shipping and handling. Language: English. Abstract: The purpose of amplification technology is to efficiently and effectively channel sound to the brain. In this chapter of the fourth edition of Auditory Disorders in School Children the author details the rationale and use of classroom amplification systems. Subject Category: Speech. Hearing. Descriptors: Auditory Processing Disorder. Hard-of-Hearing Children. Learning Disabilities. Mild Hearing Loss. Conductive Hearing Loss. Special Education Programs.

353.

Output Levels of Commercially Available Portable Compact

Disc Players and the Potential Risk to Hearing.

Author(s): Fligor, B. J., Cox, L. C. Source: Ear and Hearing: Journal of The American Auditory Society. 25(6): 586-97. December 2004. Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 530 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621. Voice: (215) 521-8300. Website: http://www.ear-hearing.com. Language: English. Abstract: The study discussed in this article measured the sound levels generated by the headphones of commercially available portable compact disc players to provide hearing healthcare providers with safety guidelines based on a theoretical noise dose model. The authors point out that there is documentation that personal stereo systems (headphones) are capable of delivering potentially toxic levels of sound under certain conditions, but no clinically applicable guidelines available for the hearing healthcare provider to recommend responsible use. In this report the research team sought to measure output levels from a variety of manufacturers of personal stereo systems and several different styles of headphones and calculate the theoretical listening duration and volume control setting that would constitute a hazardous noise dose. The study findings indicated variation in output levels among CD player manufacturers and systematic differences in output levels depending on the style of headphone. All the CD players studied were capable of delivering sound levels that could result in toxic noise exposure given sufficient listening duration. Guidelines constituting responsible portable CD player use are given for specific CD players and headphones at various volume control settings. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Noise Induced Hearing Loss. Noise Safety Guidelines. Noise Levels. Hazardous Noise. Hearing Health. Hearing Research.

354.

SSRI Use by Tinnitus Patients: Interactions Between

Depression and Tinnitus Severity.

Author(s): Folmer, R. L., Shi, Y. B. Source: ENT: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal. 83(2): 107-17. February 2004. Availability: Available from Medquest Communications LLC, 3800 Lakeside Avenue, Suite 201, Cleveland, OH 44114. (216) 391-9100. E- mail: circulation@entjournal.com. Web site: http://www.entjournal.com/. Language: English. Abstract: Depression is often coincident with chronic tinnitus, and several studies have suggested that antidepressant medications may play a role in relieving tinnitus as well as depression. The authors of this article conducted a retrospective study of the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by patients at a large tinnitus clinic to assess the effects of these antidepressants on tinnitus severity. The subjects were a subgroup of 30 patients with depression who had begun taking SSRI medication after the onset of their tinnitus, and who had been treated also with psychotherapy by a mental health clinician. At a mean follow-up of 20.6 months, the researchers found that: only 10 of the 30 patients reported that they were still experiencing major depression; the group as a whole demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in tinnitus symptoms as reflected by a reduction in their Tinnitus Severity Index scores. The writers conclusions were that SSRIs represent one category of tools that can be used to help patients with severe tinnitus and depression and, like all antidepressant medications, SSRIs should be used in conjunction with psychotherapy to facilitate patient improvement. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Tinnitus. Chronic Tinnitus. Tinnitus Treatment. Tinnitus Research. Tinnitus Severity Index. Hearing Disorder.

355.

A Chat About Radiosurgery.

56

Author(s): Friedman, W. A. Source: Cumming, GA. ANA Notes. September 2004. Availability: Available from Acoustic Neuroma Association. 600 Peachtree Parkway, Suite 108, Cumming, GA 30041. 770-205-8211; Fax:770-205-0239. Web site: http://www.ANAUSA.org. E-mail: ANAUSA@aol.com. Language: EN. Abstract: This article discusses radiosurgery as a treatment option for acoustic neuroma. The author hopes to provide an up-to-date summation of radiosurgery option, good and bad, for readers. The author describes the term radiosurgery as one coined by a Swedish neurosurgeon, Lars Leksell, in the 1950s, to describe his method of focusing hundreds of small beams of radiation on a target within the head. 2 figures included. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Acoustic Neuroma Surgery. Radiation. Ear Disorder Therapy.

356.

Research in Progress: Molecular and Neural Perspectives on

Age-Related Hearing Loss.

Author(s): Frisina, R. D. Source: In: the ASHA leader. 9(13)16. July 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Web site: http://www.asha.org/. Language: English. Abstract: In this research brief the author discusses past and current studies on presbycusis-age-related hearing loss. A recent molecular investigation is using gene arrays and mouse animal models to further understand the molecular genetic basis of presbycusis. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Age-Related Hearing Loss. Presbycusis. Hearing Loss. Deafness Research. Hearing Impairment. Research. Aging.

357.

Schools and Programs In the United States.

Author(s): Gallaudet University Press. Source: In: American Annals of the Deaf, Reference Issue 2004. Washington, D.C. American Annals of the Deaf. 149(2) Reference Issue 2004. 93-166 pp. Availability: Available from Gallaudet University Press Denison House. 800 Florida Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20002. (202) 651-5488 (Voice/TTY; Fax: (202) 651-5489. E-mail: frances.clark@gallaudet.edu. Web site: http://gupress.gallaudet.edu/annals. PRICE: $30 for a single copy, plus shipping and handling. Language: English. Abstract: Contained in the American Annals of the Deaf, Reference Issue 2004, this is a directory of information about U.S. schools and programs enrolling children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The references are listed alphabetically by state and city and includes schools--residential, day, center schools; local programs; and other types of facilities. Contact information to update or include a program is included. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Student Reference. Educational Programs for Deaf Students. Deaf-Blind Children. Deaf Students. Deafness Research. Deafness Advocacy. Hearing Disorder. Hearing Impairment. Deafness. Hard-of-Hearing. Hearing Disability.

358.

Programs For Training Interpreters.

Author(s): Gallaudet University Press. Source: In: American Annals of the Deaf, Reference Issue 2004. Washington, D.C. American Annals of the Deaf. 149(2) Reference Issue 2004. 198-204 pp. Availability: Available from Gallaudet University Press Denison House. 800 Florida Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20002. (202) 651-5488 (Voice/TTY; Fax: (202) 651-5489. E-mail: frances.clark@gallaudet.edu. Web site: http://gupress.gallaudet.edu/annals. PRICE: $30 for a single copy, plus shipping and handling. Language: English. Abstract: Contained in the American Annals of the Deaf, Reference Issue 2004, this listing of programs for training interpreters for the deaf is intended for use as a quick reference guide. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Student Reference. Educational Programs for Deaf Students. Deaf-Blind Children. Deaf Students. Deafness Research.

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