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Source: In: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. 14(32):12. August 2004. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278-1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: www.advanceweb.com. Language: English. Abstract: This article presents an overview of FM technology and how audiologists can utilize these systems, in conjunction with hearing aids, to improve signal-to-noise ration for deaf and hard-of-hearing clients. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Assistive Devices. Hearing Loss. Deafness. FM Systems. FM Technology. Hearing Aids.

373.

Emergency Preparedness: What You Can Do.

Author(s): Heppner.C.A. Source: Hearing Loss. Bethesda, MD. 25(1):13 Jan/Feb 2004. Availability: Available from Self help for Hard of Hearing People. 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 1200, Bathesda, MD 20814. Voice: (301) 657- 2248. TTY (301) 657-2249. Web site: www.shhh.org. Language: English. Abstract: Emergency preparedness tips for persons with hearing loss from the director of the Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC). Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Loss. Emergency Warning Systems. Weather Emergency. Emergency Preparedness. Telecommunications Act.

374.

Auditory Processing Efficiency and Temporal Resolution in

Children and Adults.

Author(s): Hill, P. R. Source: In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: Speech. (47)5:1022-1029. October 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. (888) 498-6699. TTY (301) 897-0157. Web site: http://www.asha.org. Language: English. Abstract: In this article researchers report on a study to examine the competing hypotheses of 'temporal resolution' and 'efficiency' by measuring backward masking (BM) as a function of signal-to-masker interval in children and adults. The children manifested significantly higher thresholds than the adults at each of the intervals. Subsequent modeling and analyses showed that the data for both children and adults were best fitted using the same, fixed temporal window. The researchers conclude that the differences in BM threshold between adults and children were not due to differences in temporal resolution but to reduced detection efficiency in the children. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Backward Masking. Auditory Processing Disorder. Internal Noise. Attention.

375.

Trade-Offs Between Informativeness and Speed of Message

Delivery in Augmentative and Alternative Communication.

Author(s): Hoag, L. A. Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. (47)6:1270-85. December 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. (888) 498-6699. TTY (301) 897-0157. Web site: http://www.asha.org. Language: English. Abstract: In this paper the authors review a study that examines trade- offs between the informativeness of a prestored message and its speed of delivery and report the study findings. (This report is the second in a series of investigations designed to develop a working model identifying the effects of trade-offs between selected conversational maxims on public attitudes toward augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system users and their communication.) In this current study the participants were 96 salesclerks. Sixteen scripted, videotaped conversational conditions, involving an AAC customer and a clerk at a checkout counter, were used to manipulate message informativeness and speed of message delivery. Following each assigned viewing, participants completed a questionnaire designed to assess their attitudes toward the AAC user and his or her communication. The authors discussion include implications regarding a model of conversational trade-offs and

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technological applications. Subject Category: Speech. Hearing. Descriptors: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Utterance- Based Computer Systems. Theory Development. Public Attitudes. Maxim Violations.

376.

The Penetrating Electrode Auditory Brainstem Implant (PABI).

Author(s): House Ear Institute. Source: In: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. 14(23):13 June 2004. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278-1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: http://www.advanceforspanda.com/. Language: English. Abstract: Seeking to match the performance of cochlear implants, the House ear Institute (HEI) in Los Angeles, CA has developed the penetrating electrode auditory brainstem implant (PABI). This system is described as the first of its kind to try to provide hearing sensations to people who are deaf, and the first brain implant to replace a human sense. To date five patients in the United States have received the PABI. This article talks about this new technological milestone in auditory devices. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Listening Assistive Device. Hearing Assistive Technology. Auditory Devices. Deafness. Audiology.

377.

Speech Perception by Students With Cochlear Implants Using

Sound-Field Systems in Classrooms.

Author(s): Iglehart, F. Source: In: American Journal of Audiology. 13(1)62. June 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Web site: http://www.asha.org/. Language: English. Abstract: Eighty percent of hearing impaired students with cochlear implants are using sound-field systems to improve audition in classrooms. This article reports on a study that compares speech perception by fourteen school-age cochlear implant recipients via two classroom sound- field systems, one wall-mounted and the other a personal, or desktop, system. Testing was conducted in two classroom environments, one noisy and reverberant (typical of many classrooms) and the other ideally quiet with reverberation of short duration. In the quiet room with low reverberation, both sound-field systems produced improved phoneme recognition, but there was no difference between the two. In the noisy room with high reverberation, the sound-field benefits were greater, and the desktop systems provided more benefit than the wall-mounted systems. Subject Category: Hearing. Speech. Descriptors: Hearing Assistive Devices. FM Systems. Hearing Impaired Students. Cochlear Implants. Deafness. Communication.

378.

Balance Disorders in the Elderly.

Author(s): Ives, T. E. Source: In: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. 14(15):22. April 2004. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278-1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: http://www.advanceforspanda.com/. Language: English. Abstract: According to the writer of this article, more than half of the U.S. population will experience a balance or vestibular disorder in their lifetime, and balance disorders are the number one health complaint of patients over seventy. The author discusses the medical and social implications of vestibular disorders in the elderly population. Subject Category: Hearing. Balance. Descriptors: Balance Disorder. Dizziness. Vestibular Disorder.

379.

Speech Intelligibility of Young School-Aged Children in the

Presence of Real-Life Classroom Noise.

Author(s): Jamieson, D. G., Kranjc, G., Yu, K., Hodgetts, W. E. Source: American Academy of Audiology. Reston, VA. 15(7):508-17.

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