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398.

Fun With a Special Focus: Camps for Children With

Developmental, Speech, and Hearing Disorders.

Author(s): Mosheim, J. Source: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. 14(11):10. March 2004. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278-1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: www.advanceweb.com. Language: English. Abstract: More summer camps are being developed for children with special needs. The year 2004 Annual Camp Edition of ADVANCE highlights programs for children with cochlear implants in Dallas, TX; developmental disabilities in Nashville, TN; hearing impairment in Washington, DC; and fluency disorders in Wichita, KS. Subject Category: Hearing. Language. Speech. Descriptors: Special Needs Children. Developmental Disabilities. Speech Disorder. Children With Cochlear Implants. Recreation for Special Needs Children. Summer Camp. Behavior Disorder. Autism. Stuttering.

399.

FM Technology: Optimal Listening for Young Children.

Author(s): Mosheim, J. Source: In: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. 14(25):12. June 2004. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278- 1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: www.advanceweb.com. Language: English. Abstract: In his article, the author states that premature babies exposed to ototoxic drugs are at risk for early hearing loss. The author also states that though gentamicin can kill disease-causing bacteria, the antibiotic also can kill hair cells in both ears, resulting in hearing loss, tinnitus and balance problems. In his article the author discusses managing hearing loss in small children, with a focus on the advantages of coupling an FM system to the children's hearing aids. The author concludes that, with hearing loss being the No. 1 birth defect in the United States, the need for well-trained pediatric audiologists to provide appropriate diagnostic and follow-up services, including amplification, is obvious. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Children. Hard-of-Hearing Children. Deaf Children. Assistive Listening Devices. Hearing Aid. Children With Hearing Loss. Deafness.

400.

The Influence of Multiple Presentations on Judgments of

Children's Phonetic Accuracy.

Author(s): Munson, B., Brinkman, K. N. Source: In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. (13)4:341- 54. November 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. (888) 498-6699. TTY (301) 897-0157. Web site: http://www.asha.org. Language: English. Abstract: Two experiments examined whether listening to multiple presentations of recorded speech stimuli influences the reliability and accuracy of judgments of children's speech production accuracy. In Experiment 1, 10 listeners phonetically transcribed words produced by children with phonological impairments after a single presentation and after the word was played 7 times. The researchers find that inter- and- intratranscriber reliability in the single- and multiple-presentation conditions did not differ significantly. In Experiment 2, 18 listeners provided binary correct/incorrect judgments of /s/ accuracy in single- and multiple-presentation conditions. The findings show no systematic effect of presentation condition on either accuracy or intrarater reliability but show greater interrater reliability in the multiple-presentation condition, particularly for tokens of /s/ that were incorrect or acoustically intermediate between an incorrect and a correct /s/. As a whole the study results suggest that multiple presentations have no measurable effect on the accuracy and intrarater reliability of judgments of children's phonetic accuracy, but that they do have a small effect on interrater reliability. The authors also discuss the clinical implications. Subject Category: Speech. Hearing. Descriptors: Phonological and Articulation Disorders. Speech Disorders. Speech Assessment. Speech Perception.

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401.

Assessment and Remediation of An Auditory Processing

Disorder Associated With Head Trauma.

Author(s): Musiek, F. E., Baran, J. A., Shinn, J. Source: American Academy of Audiology. Reston, VA. 15(2):117-32. February 2004. Availability: Available from the American Academy of Audiology. Publications, 11730 Plaza America Drive, Suite 300, Reston, VA 20190. Voice: 800-AAA-2336; 703-790-8466. Fax: 703-790-8631. Web site: http://www.audiology.org/. Language: English. Abstract: This case study report highlights a number of important clinical characteristics and features associated with minor head injury, specifically that: auditory deficits can be a sequel to minor head injury; these deficits are often subtle and may not be detected unless central auditory testing is conducted; and these deficits may be amenable to remediation. The case involves a 41-year-old female patient who sustained a mild traumatic brain injury during a horseback riding accident. The patient was seen for medical and neuropsychological testing following the accident and subsequently referred to a speech-language pathologist for rehabilitative services. After 13 months the patient had little progress and requested an audiologic work-up. The results revealed normal peripheral hearing and significant central auditory deficits. Based on these findings, an auditory rehabilitation program was developed and implemented. The components of this patient's rehabilitation program and the post-therapy improvements noted in her auditory functions are reviewed here. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Auditory Evoked Potentials. Auditory Perceptual Disorder. Auditory Processing Disorder. Central Auditory Processing Disorder. Head Injury. Traumatic Brain Injury.

402.

Central Deafness Associated With A Midbrain Lesion.

Author(s): Musiek, F. E., Charette, L., Morse, D., Baran, J. A. Source: American Academy of Audiology. Reston, VA. 15(2):133-51. February 2004. Availability: Available from the American Academy of Audiology. Publications, 11730 Plaza America Drive, Suite 300, Reston, VA 20190. Voice: 800-AAA-2336; 703-790-8466. Fax: 703-790-8631. Web site: http://www.audiology.org/. Language: English. Abstract: Central deafness is defined in this report as a relatively rare disorder but one that, if appropriately defined and investigated, can add much to the understanding of the specific anatomical structures within the human brain that are involved in the processing of auditory stimuli. The authors view this present investigation as having extended the understanding of the potential anatomical correlates to central deafness by demonstrating that bilateral involvement of an auditory structure within the midbrain can additionally result in this condition. This case report documents the range of auditory deficits that may be associated with damage to the inferior colliculi, and profiles a hierarchical recovery of auditory function consistent with test findings. The subject is a 21-year-old male with a subarachnoid bleed affecting both inferior colliculi. The subject showed significant auditory deficits for the middle and late auditory evoked potentials, while electrophysiologic measures of the periphery indicated normal function. The patient was enrolled in a rehabilitation program for approximately 14 weeks. Although initially unresponsive to sounds, the patient regained most of his auditory abilities during the 10 months he was followed. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Auditory Processing Disorder. Central Auditory Disorder. Central Deafness. Inferior Colliculus.

403.

Assistive Devices.

Author(s): Musket, C. H. Source: In: Auditory Disorders in School Children, Fourth Edition. Roeser, R.J.; Downs, M.P., ed. York, PA. Thieme 2004. 306-22. Availability: Available from Thieme New York. 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001. Toll-free: (800) 782-3488. Fax: (212) 947-1112. E-mail: customerservice@thieme.com. Web site: http://www.thieme.com. ISBN: 1-58890-228-5. PRICE: $59 plus shipping and handling. Language: English. Abstract: The term 'assistive device' is used within the discipline of audiology to refer to any device, other than personal hearing aids or a cochlear implant, designed to improve communication or awareness of

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