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auditory signals in the environment for those with hearing loss. In this chapter of the fourth edition of Auditory Disorders in School Children the author provides an overview of the extensive and versatile array of assistive devices that could benefit students with hearing impairments and the federal laws that mandate and regulate many of these devices. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Auditory Processing Disorder. Hard-of-Hearing Children. Learning Disabilities. Assistive Listening Devices. Special Education Programs.

404.

Essentials of Hearing Aid Selection, Part 3: Perception Is

Reality.

Author(s): Mynders, J. Source: The Hearing Review. February 2004. 11(2):22. Availability: Correspondence can be addressed to HR or Joel Mynders, AP Mynders & Associates, Inc, 129 North Church St, West Chester, PA 19180. Language: English. Abstract: This third part of a 3-part series on the various methods of hearing aid selection examines how subjective responses can be used during the hearing aid selection process. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Aids. Hearing Assistive Devices. Choosing Hearing

Aids.

405.

Lessons in Shooter Safety-You Can Prevent Hearing Loss:

Always Wear Ear Protection While Shooting.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). 2004. [1 p.]. Availability: Available from NIDCD Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. Language: EN. Abstract: This 1-page fact sheet presents important information for individuals on a less often discussed aspect of firearm safety-hearing protection to avoid noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The fact sheet discusses causes of noise NIHL and prevention methods. Hearing protection for those using firearms includes wearing earplugs or earmuffs when shooting a rifle, shotgun, or pistol. This fact sheet is a production of WISE EARS(r), a coalition of government agencies, nonprofit organizations, businesses, industries and unions to prevent NIHL. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Protection. Noise Pollution. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. Deafness. Hearing Impairment. Hearing Health. Prevention.

406.

Usher Syndrome: New Insights Lead to Earlier Treatment.

Author(s): National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Source: Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). February 2004. [4 p.]. Availability: Available from NIDCD Information Clearinghouse. 1 Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456. Voice: (800) 241- 1044. TTY (800) 241-1055. Fax: (301) 907-8830. E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov. Website: www.nidcd.nih.gov. PRICE: Single copy free. NIH Publication Number 98-4291A. Language: EN. Abstract: This NIDCD fact sheet discusses better treatment options for Usher syndrome, based on a recent discovery of a method by which to identify the disorder at birth. Usher syndrome is an inherited hearing and vision disorder. Children with Usher syndrome type I are usually born deaf or hearing-impaired in both ears and suffer an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa. With retinitis pigmentosa vision worsens over time. However, vision problems often don't appear until a child is older-around age 10 for those with the most severe form of Usher syndrome and age 20 for those with a less severe form. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Genetic Disorders. Usher Syndrome. Hearing Loss. Visual Impairment. Communication Strategies. Research. Deaf Blindness. Screening. Diagnosis. Symptoms.

64

407.

Rethinking Hearing Aid Occlusion.

Author(s): Navarro, R. Source: In: The Hearing Review. 11(3):42. March 2004. Availability: Available from CurAnt Communications Inc., Publisher. 6701 Center Drive West, Suite 450, Los Angeles, CA 90045-1535. (310) 642- 4400. (310) 641-0831 (Fax). Web site: www.hearingreview.com. Language: English. Abstract: In this article the author supports the idea that the hearing aid occlusion (HAO) effect is a distinctly different phenomenon from the threshold occlusion effect and offers the reader four reasons why HAO and threshold occlusion are two different things. The author concludes that dispensing professionals may need to rethink the process to develop more effective solutions to help solve patients' HAO complaints. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Aid Technology. Hearing Aid. Deafness. Hearing Impairment. Assistive Listening Devices. Audiology.

408.

The Relationship of Tinnitus, Hyperacusis, and Hearing Loss.

Author(s): Nelson, J. J., Chen, K. Source: In: ENT: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal 83(7):472. July 2004. Availability: Available from Medquest Communications LLC, 3800 Lakeside Avenue, Suite 201, Cleveland, OH 44114. (216) 391-9100. E- mail: circulation@entjournal.com. Web site: http://www.entjournal.com/. Language: English. Abstract: The authors discuss the relationship among tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss which is described in the article as an often-underdiagnosed combination of symptoms that causes physical, mental, and emotional distress for millions of patients. The authors' position is that these symptoms may have a common pathophysiology-- specifically, improper function of cochlear hair cells may result in a hearing loss secondary to the failure of these cells to propagate proper signals through the auditory centers. In addition, the authors believe that: in response to an incongruous neural message, higher auditory cortical centers may adapt and remodel transmitted sound; this neuroplasticity may lead to an increased perception of volume in the auditory cortex (hyperacusis) and to the perception of phantom sounds (tinnitus); awareness of the potential relationship among tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss may contribute to improved diagnosis, treatment, and follow- up for patients with these conditions. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Problems. Hearing Impairment. Hearing Loss. Tinnitus. Hyperacusis. Hyperacute Hearing. Noise Levels.

409.

Self-Reported Tinnitus and Noise Sensitivity Among

Adolescents in Sweden.

Rural Gifted Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: How

Electronic Technology Can Help.

Author(s): Olsen Widen, S. E., Erlandsson, S. I., Belcastro, F. P. Source: In: Noise & Health. (7)25:29-40. October-December 2004. American Annals of the Deaf. 149(4): 309-13. Fall 2004. Availability: Full-text article available online from www.igenta.com or address correspondence to University of Trollhattan-Uddevalla, Box 1236, S-462 28 Vanersborg, Sweden. E-mail: Stephen.Olsen@htu.se. Noise and Health: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/noiseandhealth/. Language: English.;English. Abstract: This report contains research data and findings from a hearing protection study. Subjects are high-school students (1285), aged 13 to 19 years, in the United Kingdom (UK). The data used is self-reported hearing-related symptoms, such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity. Results show the prevalence of permanent tinnitus and noise sensitivity, reported in the total group, was 8.7 percent and 17.1 percent respectively; permanent tinnitus was not significantly related to level of socio-economic status, but age-related differences in the prevalence rates of experienced tinnitus and noise sensitivity were found to be significant; older students reported such symptoms to a greater extent than younger students did; those who reported tinnitus and other hearing-related symptoms protected their hearing to the highest extent and were the most concerned. This document lists Web sites for online college and high school courses, tutoring, and assistance to teachers of gifted students in rural areas who are deaf or hard of hearing. The author also recommends ways that legislatures and rural school districts can make Internet resources and assistive technology more widely available in rural educational settings. Subject Category: Hearing.;Hearing.

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