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Descriptors: Noise. Adolescent Health. Hearing Protection. Tinnitus. Noise Sensitivity. Teenage Hearing Health.;Rural Schools. Deaf Students. Hard-of-Hearing Students. Rural Educational Settings. Online Courses. Distance Learning.

410.

When Hearing Loss Occurs With Other Disabilities.

Author(s): Parrish, R., Roush, J. Source: Washington, DC. Volta Voices. 11(7):20-21. November 2004. Availability: Available from Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007. 202-337-5220; TTY: 202-337-5221; FAX: 202-337-8314. Web site: www.agbell.org. Language: English. Abstract: Information to aid parents raising children with hearing loss and one or more other disabilities. The authors encourage these parents to acquaint themselves with the laws and policies that provide such children with access to special education and medical services, as well as other issues and dynamics involved in caring and managing a child with multiple disabilities. The article provides additional resources related to these issues. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Infant Hearing Loss. Children. Hearing Impairment. Children With Disabilities. Deafness.

411.

Speech Intelligibility of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

With 7 Years of Device Experience.

Author(s): Peng, S., Spencer, L. J., Tomblin, J. B. Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. (47)6:1227-35. December 2004. Availability: Available from American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. (888) 498-6699. TTY (301) 897-0157. Web site: http://www.asha.org. Language: English. Abstract: The authors of this paper review an experiment in which speech intelligibility of 24 prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 84 months of device experience was investigated. Among the key findings reported is that approximately 70 percent of a particular set of utterances produced by pediatric CI recipients, with 7 years of device experience, could be understood by unfamiliar listeners. Subject Category: Hearing. Speech. Descriptors: Cochlear Implants. Speech Intelligibility. Speech Development. Speech Production.

412.

Multiple Challenges-Multiple Solutions: Children With Hearing

Loss and Special Needs.

Author(s): Perigoe, C. B., Perigoe, R. Source: Washington, DC. The Volta Review 104(4) [182 pp]. 2004. Availability: Available from the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Publications Department, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007. (202) 337-5220 or (202)337-5221 (TTY). Website: www.agbell.org. Language: English. Abstract: This monograph focuses on children who are deaf or hard of hearing and have additional disabilities. Chapters take readers through a series of stages in developing a greater understanding of children with hearing loss and other special needs. The first chapter addresses the issue of counseling parents of children with hearing loss and additional special needs. Chapter two reviews current epidemiological studies estimating the prevalence and incidence of permanent hearing loss in children. In chapter three, the author presents information on the psychological assessment of children with multiple handicaps who have hearing loss. The next two chapters focus on hearing loss among children who have attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and children who are blind. Chapter six examines the degree of ethnic diversity that exists among children with hearing loss. The seventh chapter presents learning conditions developed by Brian Cambourne that form a framework for developing appropriate environments to foster language and literacy learning. In the eighth chapter, the author describes a public school Cued Speech program for children with hearing loss and special learning needs. Chapter nine describes the Association Method for children with hearing loss and special needs. The final two chapters focus on cochlear implants for children with hearing loss and special needs. 2 figures. 11 tables. Numerous references.

65

Subject Category: Hearing. Language. Speech. Descriptors: Children. Hearing Loss. Multiple Disabilities. Epidemiology. Etiology. Counseling. Attention Deficit Disorder. Blindness. Literacy. Cued Speech. Public Schools. Cochlear Implants. Speech Perception.

413.

Children With Permanent Hearing Loss and Associated

Disabilities: Revisiting Current Epidemiological Data and Causes of

Deafness.

Author(s): Picard, M. Source: In: The Volta Review: Multiple Challenges-Multiple Solutions: Children With Hearing Loss and Special Needs. Perigoe, C.B.; Perigoe, R., Eds. Washington, DC. The Volta Review 104(4):221-236. 2004. Availability: Available from the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Publications Department, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007. (202) 337-5220 or (202)337-5221 (TTY). Website: www.agbell.org. Language: English. Abstract: This chapter provides current data on the prevalence and incidence of permanent hearing loss in children, trends in ages of onset of hearing loss, and causes of hearing loss throughout the world. The author presents studies estimating the number of children with hearing loss and additional special needs in various countries and identifies some well- known causes of hearing loss that have co-associated occurring disabilities. In addition, the author presents the case of linguistically diverse children as a new group of children with hearing loss who may function with multiple disabilities. A few of the conclusions reached by the author are that sensorineural hearing loss in newborns remains high worldwide and that the level of development of a country is related to prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss in the newborn population. 3 tables. 50 references. (AA-M). Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Children. Infants. Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Multiple Disabilities. Epidemiology. Prevalence. Incidence. Etiology.

414.

Is the End Near for Acoustic Feedback?

Author(s): Pirzanski, C., Berge, B. Source: In: The Hearing Review. 11(4):18. April 2004. Availability: Available from CurAnt Communications Inc., Publisher. 6701 Center Drive West, Suite 450, Los Angeles, CA 90045-1535. (310) 642- 4400. (310) 641-0831 (Fax). Web site: www.hearingreview.com. Language: English. Abstract: According to this article, digital shell-making technology holds great possibilities for the fitting process. However, this technology will be limited by the same factors that limit traditional impression-taking technologies, a need for the use of open-mouth impressions and higher viscosity impression materials. The authors of this article present a review of the various materials and technologies for readers and conclude that, regardless of the technology, to obtain the best fitting results clinicians should modify their impression technique and routinely take open-mouth impressions with a firmer silicone for all hearing instruments. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Aid Technology. Hearing Aid Fitting. Hearing Aid Mold. Audiology. Open Mouth Ear Impression technique.

415.

Endoscopic Middle Ear and Mastoid Surgery.

Author(s): Poe, D. S. Source: In: Middle Ear and Mastoid Surgery: Haberman, R. S., ed. York, PA. Thieme 2004. pp.168-76. Availability: Available from Thieme New York. 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001. Toll-free: (800) 782-3488. Fax: (212) 947-1112. E-mail: customerservice@thieme.com. Web site: http://www.thieme.com. ISBN: 1-5889-0173-4. PRICE: $109 plus shipping and handling. Language: EN. Abstract: As stated by the author of this chapter from the text Middle Ear and Mastoid Surgery, endoscopy has created new opportunities for minimally invasive techniques in middle ear and temporal bone surgery. The author states also that endoscopes offer the potential for reducing open surgical exposure, reducing operating time, improving cholesteatoma eradication, and minimizing surgically induced artifacts during middle ear exploration for perilymphatic fistulas. In this chapter the author discusses surgical equipment, the conditions for which endoscopic surgery is applicable, technique and procedure including second-look mastoidectomy, and future progresses in the field. Include figures and

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