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Abstract: In this paper, the author discusses his research to determine if P1 Cortical Auditory Evoked Potential (CAEP) may aid in evaluating the benefit from a hearing aid and/or cochlear implant (CI) in hearing-impaired infants. According to the author, behavioral audiometric thresholds are difficult to obtain in infants and thresholds do not completely assess the contribution of amplification to central auditory system development. From the research, the author finds that, when combined with traditional behavioral measures of audiological and speech-language assessment, P1 latencies can provide information relevant to the issue of whether to provide a child with a cochlear implant following an appropriate hearing- aid trial. The author concludes also that this bio-marker can benefit clinicians who use it to monitor the development of central auditory pathways after a child has been fitted with a CI. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Impaired Infants. Newborn Hearing Screening. Newborn Hearing Rehabilitation. Central Auditory System. Cochlear Implants. Hearing Research.

584.

Inner Ear Abnormalities in Patients With Goldenhar

Syndrome.

Author(s): Sotirios, B., Minoo, L., Lenarz, T., Becker, H. Source: Otology & Neurotology. 26(3):398-404. May 2005. Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Customer Service, P.O. Box 1175, Lowell, MA 01853. (978) 262-9611. Fax: (978) 262-9617. Website: www.otology-neurotology.com. Language: English. Abstract: The authors of this article report on a study in which they investigate the inner-ear malformations in patients with Goldenhar syndrome and hypothesize the potential embryopathogenesis of these malformations. The study subjects are 14 patients with Goldenhar syndrome. Each patient underwent hearing tests and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone. In six patients, magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone also was performed. Based on results, the authors report that their observations correlate with the reported cases in the literature and may help to hypothesize the embryological origin of these malformations. The authors emphasize that specialists evaluating patients with Goldenhar syndrome should be aware of the possibility of inner-ear malformations which could be diagnosed earlier with appropriate imaging studies. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Birth Defects. Infant Hearing. Inner-Ear Malformation. Hearing Research. Children.

585.

AAC and Aphasia: New Resource for Clinicians Treating

Adults With Acquired Aphasia.

Author(s): Steele.R.D. Source: ADVANCE for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. March 2005. 15(13):14-15. Availability: Available from Merion Publications, Inc. 2900 Horizon Drive, Box 61556, King of Prussia, PA 19406-0956. 610-278-1400. E-mail: advance@merion.com. Website: www.advanceweb.com. Language: English. Abstract: Concise Reference Sheets on 'AAC and Aphasia' designed for use by clinical speech-language pathologists who serve adults with acquired aphasia, are accessible for downloading online, at no cost. According to this fact sheet, these reference sheets can help in covering essential aphasia treatment steps systematically: from reviewing clinical features of a syndrome to identifying a client's communicator type, carrying out the steps involved in matching a client with an appropriate speech-generating device, and introducing and training on the device. Subject Category: Speech. Language. Hearing. Descriptors: Speech Disorder. Acquired Aphasia. Speech-Language Pathology. Audiology.

586.

Evaluation of Botulinum Toxin A in Treatment of Tinnitus.

Author(s): Stidham, K. R., Solomon, P. H., Roberson, J. B. Source: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 132(6): 883-889. June 2005. Availability: Available from Elsevier Science. (800) 654-2452. Fax: (212) 633-3820. E-mail: reprints@elsevier.com. Website: www.us.elsevierhealth.com. Language: English. Abstract: This text documents an oral presentation at the Annual Meeting

93

of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, September 19, 2004. The authors reported on a study they conducted to evaluate the potential benefit of botulinum toxin A in treatment of tinnitus with a prospective, double-blinded study design. The study subjects were 30 patients with tinnitus who were placed randomly into one of two treatment arms. Patients received either botulinum toxin A (20 to 50 units) or saline injection at the first treatment, and the opposite treatment 4 months later. Prospective data, including a tinnitus matching test, tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), tinnitus rating scale (TRS), and patient questionnaires, were obtained over a 4-month period after each injection. The authors concluded that this small study showed improvement in THI scores and patient subjective results after botulinum toxin A injection compared with placebo, a finding that suggests a possible benefit of botulinum toxin A in tinnitus management. The team suggested that larger studies are needed to further evaluate potential benefits of botulinum toxin A in treatment of this difficult problem. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Disorder. Tinnitus Management. Hearing Research. Hearing Dysfunction.

587.

Cochlear Implantation in Patients With Osteogenesis

Imperfecta.

Author(s): Streubel, S. O., Lustig, L. R. Source: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 132(5): 735-740. May 2005. Availability: Available from Elsevier Science. (800) 654-2452. Fax: (212) 633-3820. E-mail: reprints@elsevier.com. Website: www.us.elsevierhealth.com. Language: English. Abstract: This article reviews a study in which researchers sought to evaluate the feasibility and functional outcome of cochlear implantation in two patients with OI tarda type I with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SHL). Based on patient data and findings, the authors concluded that cochlear implantation in patients with OI is not only technically possible but results are similar to implant outcomes for patients with SHL from a variety of other causes. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Hearing Loss Rehabilitation. Hearing Research. Cochlear Implants. Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Genetic Disorder.

588.

Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated With Inner

Ear Anomaly.

Author(s): Sugiura, M. Source: Otology & Neurotology. 26(2):241-246, March 2005. Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Customer Service, P.O. 1175, Lowell, MA 01853. (978) 262-9611. Fax: (978) 262- 9617. Language: English. Abstract: The authors of this article present a review of a study they conducted at a tertiary referral center to evaluate the frequency of inner ear anomaly in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and in a set of controls. The subjects were 366 patients (165 men and 201 women; age range, 3-91 years) with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and 228 controls without sensorineural hearing loss using magnetic resonance imaging. Three hundred fifty-six patients had unilateral and 10 patients had bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Based on the results of this study, the authors conclude in their report that inner ear anomaly may be associated with sudden sensorineural hearing loss in 2.5 percent of patients. Subject Category: Hearing. Descriptors: Inner Ear Anomaly. Inner Ear Malformation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. MRI. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Deafness.

589.

Paget Disease and Sensorineural Hearing Loss Associated

With Spiral Ligament Degeneration.

Author(s): Teufert, K. B., Linthicum, J. Source: Otology & Neurotology. 26(3):387-391. May 2005. Availability: Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Customer Service, P.O. Box 1175, Lowell, MA 01853. (978) 262-9611. Fax: (978) 262-9617. Website: www.otology-neurotology.com. Language: English. Abstract: This article reports on a study based on these specific known

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