X hits on this document

157 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

25 / 65

17

CHAPTER II

THE STUDY

Gymnastics is a sport that has gained considerable attention in recent years due

in large part to its popularity and the very young age at which gymnasts begin heavy

training. For years coaches of various sports, including gymnastics, have tried to pre-

select potentially great athletes using different methods ranging from physical tests to

an array of psychological assessments. The ability to predict the behavior of an athlete

has many uses; one of the most important of these is being able to assess what

contributions an athlete will provide to an organization two, three, or 10 years down the

road (LeUnes et al., 1999).

Most prediction tests have been of the physical assessment nature. Typically,

these involve tests of strength, flexibility, body type, speed, and power. In more recent

years, testing has included psychological assessments. For example, Krane, Snow, and

Greenleaf (1997) conducted a qualitative case study of an elite gymnast to determine

whether creation of too much pressure had detrimental effects on the gymnast. The

study was based on a growing concern that too much of the wrong type of pressure has

been applied to many elite level gymnasts. Often, administrators, coaches, parents, and

athletes in elite gymnastics are willing to do whatever it takes to win, regardless of the

long-term impact on the athletes. The results of this study demonstrated that an ego-

involved motivational environment was developed and reinforced by the coaches and

parents of the gymnast throughout her career. Subsequently, the gymnast relied on

Document info
Document views157
Page views157
Page last viewedMon Dec 05 18:58:36 UTC 2016
Pages65
Paragraphs1585
Words13246

Comments