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That long awaited day came on 13 August. The Long Beach Break­water appeared dimly in the early hours of the morning through the acrid Los Angeles smog, the ship dropped anchor, and another West-Pac tour for the CACAPON came to an end.

Two days later, the ship moved to San Pedro's Todd Shipyard to have her jet fuel tanks saraned; while there, Captain E.K. Solenberger  was relieved as Commanding Officer by Captain Roger F. Miller on 23 August.

The ship left Todd's Shipyard on 14 September, and anchored in­side the Long Beach Breakwater for the next two weeks, which was ample time to complete satisfactorily an administrative inspection conducted by the U.S.S. ASHTABULA.  Early on the morning of 27 September, the CACAPON left Long Beach, and later on in the day, moored alongside the U.S.S. AJAX in San Diego for three weeks of tender availability.

Among the significant changes accomplished were the removal of some of the ship's armanent which in turn made possible, at a later day, the installation of a gyro repeater on the signal bridge, trans­forming that area into an efficient conning space.

The CACAPON's tender availability expired on 19 October.  The ship returned to Long Beach to load fuel, and from that day on, until 9 Decem­ber, she was available to provide services to Fleet Training Group, going out for several days at a time, and returning, or at least try­ing to return, on weekends. While with the Fleet Training Group, the CACAPON's own readiness was checked on during an operational readiness inspection conducted by the U.S.S. HECTOR on 19-21 November.

On 9 December, the ship entered the Long Beach Shipyard where she was to remain for the rest of the year.  The big news that was to have a crucial effect on the ship was received early in December.  The essence of the matter was that the normally scheduled tour for WestPac had been cancelled, and instead, the CACAPON had been designated as station tanker at the Eniwetok Proving Grounds for the forthcoming "Operation Hardtack".

XVIII - "The Year 1958

The New Year found the CACAPON moored in the Long Beach Shipyard, making preparations for her deployment on "Operation Hardtack", a de­ployment which would necessitate departure at least a month earlier than had originally been planned.  To enable the ship to attain optimum material condition prior to departure, Commander Service Squadron ONE scheduled an extra tender availability.

The first time the ship left Long Beach in 1958 was on 7 January, taking out numerous dependents on a days cruise to give them a general idea of Navy life and its incumbent duties. The second time that the CACAPON was underway was on 10 January, steaming to San Diego and moor­ing in a nest of several other AO's alongside the AJAX.  On 23 January,

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