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 Summary of 3rd Asphalt Shingles Recycling ForumAs of 12-18-2007

Dr. Jenna Jambeck, University of New Hampshire – Recycling Materials Resource Center “Asphalt Shingle Recycling: Recycled Materials Resource Center & Environmental Issues” 603-862-4023, Jenna.Jambeck@unh.edu

www.rmrc.unh.edu

Recycled Materials Resource Center (RMRC)

Outreach and education

How is sustainability and shingle recycling related:

Decreases or mitigates negative environmental impacts of human existence

Conserves resources

Economics

RMRC has experience evaluating risk, benefits and cost

Project 7/8 – ‘Development of a Risk Analysis Framework for Beneficial Use of Secondary Materials’

Sustainable Road Construction

o

Create  a product with consistent high quality

o

Assess environmental burdens and trade-offs of various options

o

Life-cycle assessment

Pavement Life-cycle Assessment Tool for Environmental and Economic Effects (PaLATE) [Designed by Arpad Horvath (UC Berkeley) for the RMRC]

Can address questions on economic value and environmental impacts of materials with consideration to project design and needs

Future of utilizing recycled materials, including shingles, fits in with RMRC sustainability concept

Jon T. Powell, Innovative Waste Consulting Services, LLC “Environmental Issues Associated with Asphalt Shingle Recycling” 352-331-4828; JPowell@iwcs.biz

www.ShingleRecycling.org www.iwcs.biz

“Environmental Issues Associated with Asphalt Shingle Recycling”, is a “white paper” prepared for Construction Materials Recycling Association Asphalt Shingle Recycling Project, US EPA Innovations Workgroup by Dr. Timothy Townsend, Jon Powell, Dr. Chad Xu, Innovative Waste Consulting Services, LLC, October 19, 2007.

Summarized two environmental questions/concerns raised regarding shingle recycling

Collected data from recyclers in the US

Evaluated analytical data

Published

Recycler-supplied

Will keep updating available analytical data as it is collected

“Possible” environmental and worker exposure pathways include:

Asbestos release during grinding (if ACM)

PAH emissions during HMA production

PAH release into surface or groundwater after end-use application of RAS

Asbestos summary:

Data available for 27,694 samples collected:

18 detections asbestos content <1%

408 detections asbestos content >1%

Overall, asbestos detections in 426 samples (approximately 1.53%)

Many asbestos detections were caused by other materials such as mastic that were attached to the shingle samples

Asbestos phased out as component of asphalt shingles in the early 1980’s

PAH summary:

Asphalt shingles naturally contain PAH’s

A leaching study on discarded asphalt shingles indicated that PAHs did not readily leach PAH’s

 Prepared by ShingleRecycling.org and DKAPage 8 of 11

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