X hits on this document

33 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

3 / 17

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLE

bioresources.com

EXPERIMENTAL

Materials

C. pangorei (Fig. A) was collected from different habitats such as small rivulets (Ramanadhi, Gadananadhi), streams (Servalar, KMTR range, Southern Western Ghats), and irrigation canals of rice fields (Alwarkurichi, Pathamadai, Tirunelveli). Cultivated mat sedges were collected from farm fields in Karur, Trichy district, Tamil Nadu. The sedge was raised in the department nursery without addition of organic or inorganic fertilizers under irrigated conditions. Near-natural conditions were provided for the healthy growth of plants. Only mature culms were collected for the study. Processed culm strands (subjected to retting, splitting, and dyeing) were obtained from mat weavers of Pathamadai. Cut portions from the lowermost (1 cm from the bottom-most part of the culm), middle, and upper regions (1 cm from the top-most part of the culm) were used in anatomical and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. For studies on fibre macerates, the rind and the core from the culm separated using a sharp knife were used. For analyses on chemical and mechanical properties of the fibres, processed, dyed, and undyed culm strands (Fig. B) of different counts (50, 100, 120) obtained from the mat weavers were used. Dyed culm strands were also screened to check the influence of dyeing on fibre properties.

Fig. A. Cyperus pangorei growing in natural habitat along stream and irrigation canals; Fig. B. Processed culm strands dyed with an array of natural dyes.

Benazir et al. (2010). “Sedge fibers and strands,” BioResources 5(2), 951-967.

953

Document info
Document views33
Page views33
Page last viewedFri Oct 28 22:05:35 UTC 2016
Pages17
Paragraphs335
Words7369

Comments