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33

and/or offer peer support. Student-instructor interaction can occur when one or more

students agree with the instructor on a designated time to meet which can be utilized as

  • online office hours‖. This asynchronous exchange most closely replicates the verbal

exchange

in

a

face-to-face

classroom.

Active

interactions

in

a

chat

solidify

the

community connections and interactions in a classroom.

Student Engagement and Active Learning

Web 2.0 technologies support student-student and student-instructor engagement

in an online classroom. This engagement is evidence of the active student participation

in the learning process. Ultimately, Web 2.0 tools function ―innately‖, as suggested by

Ullrich,

and

as

a

pedagogical

tool

  • characterized

by

social

learning

and

active

participation‖ (2008, p. 709).

Student engagement is a goal in most face to face and online classrooms and

creates a social and active learning environment. This engagement, as you will see in the

third section, helps to build a greater sense of classroom community. In a general sense,

motivation drives student engagement and thus student engagement increases learning.

There are many factors that motivate learners to learn, and motivation is a key

component to the working memory (learning). The more motivation a person has to

learn, the more engagement the student has while learning. Therefore, the more time

information is processed or rehearsed in working memory, the greater likelihood it will

move

to

long

term

memory.

Brooks

and

Shell

(2007)

defined

motivation

as

the

conscious or subconscious allocation of working memory to particular task. Motivation

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