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In those highest poverty schools, the areas of greatest concern, based on the percentages of teachers who are not HQ are slightly different from the overall.  They are:

1.

ESL/Bilingual

2.

Special Education

3.

Mathematics

4.

Science

5.

Language Arts/Reading

Secondary core academic classes

Table 3.  Secondary high and low poverty school core academic classes taught by non-HQ by subject – Phase I data

Secondary

All Schools

High Poverty

Low Poverty

Non HQ

Total

%

Non HQ

Total

%

Non HQ

Total

%

Arts

1

26

3.9%

1

12

8.3%

2

0.00%

English

5

136

3.7%

4

80

5.0%

1

12

8.3%

Foreign Languages

2

20

10.0%

2

12

16.7%

1

0.0%

Mathematics

12

117

10.3%

7

71

9.9%

5

11

45.5%

Science

6

91

6.6%

4

50

8.0%

2

17

11.8%

Social Studies

8

93

8.6%

7

62

11.3%

1

10

10.0%

Special Education

5

32

15.6%

5

28

17.9%

1

0.0%

Totals

39

515

7.6%

30

315

9.5%

9

54

16.7%

In Arizona's secondary classrooms, Phase I data indicates that overall, 7.6% of classes are taught by teachers who do not meet the requirements of HQT.  In the 25% of secondary schools with the highest levels of poverty, 9.5% of classes are taught by teachers who were not HQ.   In the 25% of secondary schools with the lowest poverty, this percentage is 16.7%.   These results indicate that there is a disparity in the percentages of classes taught by HQ teachers in the high and low poverty schools that disparity appears to disadvantage low poverty schools.  

While the Phase I data appears to demonstrate that equity issues related to HQ status between high and low poverty in Arizona secondary schools does not result in children in high poverty schools being taught at a higher level by non-HQ teachers than other children, Phase II and III data will provide a fuller and more detailed picture.  ADE is committed to working to assure all children are taught by highly qualified teachers and will continue its efforts to address the issue of retention and recruitment though a variety of programs and strategies which are more fully described in the Equity Plan attached.

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