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determining the value of the Separate Account. Investment income of the Separate Account, including realized net capital gains, is not taxed to us. Due to our income tax status under current provisions of the Code, no charge currently will be made to the Separate Account for our federal income taxes which may be attributable to the Separate Account. We reserve the right to make a deduction for taxes if our federal income tax treatment is determined to be other than what we currently believe it to be, if changes are made affecting the income tax treatment to our variable life insurance contracts, or if changes occur in our income tax status. If imposed, such charge would be equal to the federal income taxes attributable to the investment results of the Separate Account.

Policy Benefits

Tax Treatment as Life Insurance In order to be treated as life insurance for federal income tax purposes, the policy must meet certain requirements. If these requirements are met, the death benefits are generally received without federal income tax and the earnings on the policy are not subject to federal income tax until withdrawn. These requirements include definitional tests and rules for diversification of the policy’s investments (described below).

There are two definitional tests for life insurance in the Internal Revenue Code: (1) Cash Value Accumulation Test, and (2) Guideline Premium Test. The choice of test is dependent on several factors, including the insured’s age at issue and intention of the owner concerning policy funding patterns. If this policy permits the policy owner to select the applicable test, this selection must be made at issue and cannot be changed thereafter.

Under the Cash Value Accumulation Test, there must, at all times, be a minimum ratio of death benefit to cash value. Compliance with the test is based on the policy design at issue. The premiums permitted under this test are based on the death benefit, age and characteristics of the insured and types of riders on the policy.

Under the Guideline Premium Test, there is a limit as to the amount of premium that can be paid into the policy in relation to the death benefit. The initial premium limit is based on the death benefit, age and characteristics of the insured and types of riders on the policy. The actual premium limits each year will depend on the amount of premiums paid in a prior year. In addition to this premium test, there is also a minimum ratio of death benefit to cash value under the Cash Value Corridor. This Corridor looks to the age of the insured and the cash value each year and may require periodic adjustments in death benefit for compliance. In general, the death benefit required under this test is lower in the early years than that under the Cash Value Accumulation Test.

Death Benefit Proceeds The policy, whether or not it is a modified endowment contract (see “Modified Endowment Contracts”), should be treated as meeting the definition of a life insurance contract for federal income tax purposes under Section 7702 of the Code. As such, the death benefit proceeds thereunder should be excludable from the gross income of the beneficiary under Code Section 101(a)(1) unless there has been a transfer for valuable

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consideration or unless the specific requirements relating to Business and Corporate-Owner Policies are not met (see “Business and Corporate-Owner Policies”). Also, a policy owner should not be considered to be in constructive receipt of the cash value, including investment income. However, see the sections below on possible taxation of amounts received under the policy, via full surrender, partial surrender or loan. In addition, it is possible that the IRS may consider a benefit paid under a Living Benefits Rider as taxable income in the year of receipt.

As described above, Code Section 7702 imposes certain conditions with respect to premiums received under a policy. We monitor the premiums to assure compliance with such conditions. However, if the premium limitation is exceeded during the year, we may return the excess premium, with interest, to the policy owner within 60 days after the end of the policy year, and maintain the qualification of the policy as life insurance for federal income tax purposes.

Full Surrender Upon full surrender of a policy for its cash value, the excess, if any, of the cash value (unreduced by any outstanding indebtedness) over the premiums paid will be treated as ordinary income for federal income tax purposes. The full surrender of a policy that is a modified endowment contract may result in the imposition of an additional 10% tax on any income received.

Partial Surrender If the policy is classified as a modified endowment contract, partial surrenders and other distributions are fully taxable to the extent of income in the policy and are possibly subject to an additional 10% tax. See the discussion on modified endowment contracts below. If the policy is not a modified endowment contract, partial surrenders are generally not taxable. There are situations, however, in which a partial surrender, accompanied by a reduction in death benefits can result in current taxation. Under Code Section 7702(f)(7), where a reduction in death benefits occurs during the first 15 years after a policy is issued and there is a cash distribution associated with that reduction, the policy owner may be taxed on all or a part of that amount distributed. A reduction in death benefits may result from a partial surrender. After 15 years, the proceeds will not be subject to tax, except to the extent such proceeds exceed the total amount of premiums paid but not previously recovered. We suggest you consult with your tax advisor in advance of a proposed decrease in death benefits or a partial surrender as to the portion, if any, which would be subject to tax, and in addition as to the impact such partial surrender might have under the rules affecting modified endowment contracts.

Loans We believe that any loan received under a policy will be treated as your indebtedness. If the policy is a modified endowment contract, loans are fully taxable to the extent of income in the policy and are possibly subject to an additional 10% tax. See the discussion on modified endowment contracts. If the policy is not a modified endowment contract, we believe that no part of any loan under a policy will constitute income to you as long as the policy remains in force.

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