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Access

Economic and social class differences in literacy-specific

experiences and

access to print

resources

an intervention

strategy

have been widely documented. designed to provide access to

This study examined literacy materials and

opportunities for ters. There were

parent-child three specific

storybook

reading

in three

objectives:

(1) to

examine

Head Start Cen- the influence of

text type (highly predictable,

terns

of

interaction

between

episodic predictable, parents and children;

and narrative)

on pat-

(2) to examine

whether

there were differences ficiency and proficient language and concepts

in these patterns

parent readers;

and

of print scores

for

of interaction

between low pro-

(3) to examine gains in receptive children of low proficiency and

proficient parent in the study; 18

readers. Forty-one parents and low proficiency parent readers

their and

children participated 23 proficient parent

readers were involved in type affected patterns of influenced conversational

a 12-week book club. Results indicated that text

interaction interactions,

and that parents’ reading with different text types

proficiency serving as a

scaffold ficiency,

for parent-child

interaction.

Regardless

however,

children’s

receptive

language

of parental reading and concepts of

pro- print

improved significantly,

providing further evidence for the importance

of

parental storybook reading on children’s emerging literacy.

Might differential

ing and

enduring

shown

that many

ments

(Anderson

access to disparities

literacy-specific

experiences

contribute

to grow-

in

reading

performance?

Although

studies

have

poor

families

can and do

&

Stokes,

1984;

Neuman

provide rich & Gallagher,

literate 1994;

environ- Taylor

&

The activity that is the subject of this report was supported in part by the US. Department of Education. However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. Department of Education or the Pennsylvania Department of Education, and no official endorsement should be inferred.

The author wishes to thank Lynanne Black and Maura Moran for their assistance on this project.

Correspondence tion, CITE, Bitter

should be sent to Hall, Philadelphia,

Susan PA

B. Neuman, 19122.

Temple

University,

College

of

Educa-

495

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