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Child: Mother:

ummmnun melted, right? (recall) Does Peter like to play in the snow? (recall)

Child:

Yes (recall)

Mother: What

do

you

like to

do?

(bridging)

Child: Mother:

Make a snowman (bridging) Make a snowman or snow lady (elaboration).

What

else do you like to

Child:

do in the snow? (bridging) like. . . I like. . . I like to get snow all over me. (bridging)

Reading narrative text, therefore,

involved greater emphasis on recon-

structing certain events into account children’s

in the story, then moving outside life experiences. Unlike the more

of the text to take collaborative read-

on

more of

to

the story.

ing in the highly predictable didactic role, with the child

text, parent responding to

interactions took questions related

a

These patterns

results suggest of interactions

that different types of between parents and

text tended to elicit different children. Highly predictable

text involved parents and children in more book-focused such as the chiming of familiar words and passages. These actions have been described by some authorities (Dickinson

conversations, types of inter- & Smith, 1994;

Pellegrini narrative involving the text.

et al., 1990) as low cognitive demand talk. On the other hand,

text seemed to engage efforts to understand

dyads in more cognitively challenging talk, and make connections within and beyond

The second analysis examined

actions varied on With self-reported

the basis of proficiency

whether parents’ level as

patterns and frequencies of inter-

self-reported reading the within-participant

proficiency. variable and

the

patterns

of

interaction

as

dependent

variables,

the

MANOVA

revealed

a

significant text effect, F(12,

105) = 3.45,

.OOl. Subsequent univariate

tests (2, proficient

116) indicated significant differences between parent readers in five utterance categories:

low proficiency and attention vocative,

.Ol; bridging,

.OOl; chiming,

recalling,

14.11,

.OOl; and repeating,

4.02,

Means and

standard deviations, reported in Table 4, showed that parents who reported to have reading difficulties more often used strategies of attention vocative, chiming, and repeating, whereas proficient readers engaged in more bridg-

ing and recalling of the One low-proficiency

story. reader

and

his

child,

for

example

, reading Wenny

reflect this pattern:

Parent (reading): “Oh my, the sky is falling

. . . look, at that (attention vocative).

What’s this? (attention vocative)

Child:

(silence)

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