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children in access to literacy-specific social class differences have been print materials in child care centers

homes of low- and middle-income

experiences and print resources. Large

reported (Neuman in the availability and use as well as of in & Roskos 1993) , children (McCormick & Mason, 1986).

Consequently,

given the reported benefits of reading to young children, dif-

ferential access to books and other resources emerging literacy abilities of poor children living taged homes and communities.

may seriously

impact the

in economically

disadvan-

This study examined an intervention

strategy designed to provide access

to literary Head Start to children materials and opportunities for parents and children in three more than just print skills communicate their beliefs centers. It argued during storybook that parents convey r e a d i n g ; r a t h e r , t h e y and practices in the context of social interaction. Book clubs, therefore,

were designed to engage parents in the active process of constructing mean- ing from their own perspective and interests and then involving their chil-

dren who

in highly interactive

storybook

reading.

lacked

reading

proficiency

themselves,

it

However, for was reasoned

those parents that “access”

might involve not only

additional

supports

to

provision enhance

of materials and opportunities,

children’s

interactions

with

print

but also

and

to

make reading examined how narrative texts,

more comprehensible

to children.

Thus, our intervention

different types of books, might act as a scaffold

ranging from highly predictable

for

parent-child

interactions.

to

Results of the study indicated that patterns of book reading varied accord-

laborative

form

of

reading

together, with

responding

to

the

rhymes

and rhythms

ing to the type of text, Reading of highly

predictable stories involved a col- parents and children interactively of text. With fewer repetitive

phrases, patterns,

the episodic predictable story seemed to elicit somewhat similar although it was less involving. The narrative text, on the other

hand, engaged dyads in greater interaction around the meaning of the story

and its connections actions (Edwards, factor in examining

beyond the text. Previous studies of parent-child

inter-

1991; Ninio, categories of

1980) have often talk in storybook

ignored reading.

text as a critical In contrast, this

study confirms research by Pellegrini and families (Pellegrini et al., 1990). Storybook social activity that occurs between parent, affects parents and children’s teaching and

his colleagues with Head Start reading is a jointly constructed

child, and text: Type of text learning strategies.

Patterns

of reading,

however,

may differ according to parents’

own

reading engage

proficiency. children in

Low proficiency parent readers in this chiming and repeating text, providing

study tended to feedback when

appropriate, whereas other, more capable readers involved children in recall- defined high cog- ing and bridging categories of low behaviors. These cognitive demand relate (i.e. to previously chiming) and patterns behaviors , Nevertheless, nitive demand behaviors (i.e., bridging). even considering

these differences in patterns of interaction,

children of both low proficieny,

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