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airframe times so all the numbers are easier to compare to your current airframe time, without having to remember when that component was installed.

One of the items that should definitely be on your maintenance schedule is the date of your annual inspection. COPA advocated, on behalf of our members, for relief from the rigid regulation concerning annual inspections. The original regulation either forced owners to plan to complete their annual before the expiry date (thereby effectively making the inspection interval less than 12 months) or wait until very close to the expiry date and gamble that weather or other events may prevent them from delivering the aircraft to the mechanic, thereby grounding the aircraft.

The previous regulation CAR Standard 625.86 (2) that applies to private aircraft was as follows:

As applicable to the type of aircraft at intervals not exceeding 12 months, Part I and Part II of the Maintenance Schedule detailed in Appendix B of these standards are approved by the Minister for use on other than large aircraft, turbine-powered pressurized aeroplanes, airships, any aeroplane or helicopter operated by a flight training unit under CAR 406, or any aircraft operated by air operators under CAR Part VII.

As a result of COPA’s efforts the regulation now is as follows:

As applicable to the type of aircraft, at intervals not to expire later than the last day of the 12th month, following the preceding inspection, Part I and Part II of the Maintenance Schedule detailed in Appendix B of these standards are approved by the Minister for use on other than large aircraft, turbine-powered pressurized aeroplanes, airships, any aeroplane or helicopter operated by a flight training unit under CAR 406, or any aircraft operated by air operators under CAR Part VII.

The amendment does not provide any relief for those who wait until the end of the month to deliver the aircraft to the mechanic but at least it does not penalize those who plan ahead.

There probably isn’t any need to specify things that are part of the annual on the schedule as they should be in the annual inspection checklist that the aircraft manufacturer provides.

Small privately-owned aircraft are only required to have annual inspections, plus any inspections called up in ADs. Any manufacturer-specified 50 or 100 hour inspections are not mandatory as far as TC is concerned, although completing them may be a good idea.

Oil changes at 25 or 50 hour intervals, as applicable, are good to include, as are any recurring ADs that have either calendar times or airframe hours, or both, when they have to be completed. A good example is the well-known Canadian AD CF 90-03R2 that requires an inspection of the aircraft heat exchanger on all Canadian aircraft that have

COPA Guide to Certified Aircraft 29

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