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will also apply to these parts. That section reads: "...a foreign-manufactured part that is obtained from a manufacturer holding a type design recognized in Canada and the part is certified in accordance with the laws of the state of manufacture".

In the case of parts originating in the United States, Transport Canada has said that they interpret 571.07(2)(b) to include new parts received with any documentation (not necessarily a formal release) issued by the appropriate manufacturer, indicating that the part came from them. That could include invoices, packing slips, etc. This puts our access to US parts on the same footing as US users, and ensures Canadians do not suffer financial disadvantage by requiring additional paperwork.

3.

A standard part can be installed without a certification tag as long as it is specified

in the type design. A standard part is one that is produced to an aviation industry accepted

standard, such as AN bolts, Mil-Spec wiring etc.

4.

A commercial part can be installed without a certification tag as long as it is

specified in the type design. Commercial parts are non-aeronautical parts that an aircraft TC or STC holder specifies as being part of the aircraft type design, such as a commercial

automobile-type door seal, for instance.

5.

An FAA approved “Parts Manufacturing Authority” new part (PMA) can be

installed without a certification tag provided it is specified in the aircraft type design. For

more information on acceptance of PMA parts see CAR Standard 571.07

6.

A part that is made under CAR 571.06(4) must be installed without a certification

tag, as long as it complies with the specification of the original type certification documents. Airworthiness Manual 571.06 provides additional information on these parts.

7.

Used parts can be installed provided that it is an airworthy part that has been

removed from an aircraft for immediate installation on another aircraft, or it is an

airworthy part that has undergone maintenance for which a maintenance release has been signed as required by CAR 571.11(2)(c), or the part has been inspected and tested to ensure that the part conforms to its type design, is in a safe condition and a maintenance

release has been signed to that effect.

Making sure that the parts you install on your plane are “legal parts” and are properly documented can be confusing. If in doubt check the CARs.

Who Can Sign for Engine Overhauls?

Can an AME can sign for an overhaul on a certified aircraft engine that will be installed on a private aircraft, or does it need to be an AMO (Approved Maintenance Organization)?

This is a good question and, as usual, the answer is skillfully hidden in the CARs.

COPA Guide to Certified Aircraft 43

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