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Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Baudelia 1934 (note avoidance of anonymity)

Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Señorita Juare 1934

Fritz Henle, Frida Kahlo 1951 (the year before she died)

Bernice Kolko, Three Graces 1954

Marian Yampolsky, Untitled, 1989

Graciela Iturbide continued the habit (see Elena Poniatowska’s introductory essay to a collection of Iturbide’s images of Tehuantepec, entitled “Juchitan A Town of Women”, and see Leigh Binford’s critique of Iturbide in “Graciela Iturbide Normalising Juchitan”).

Film

As we have just seen, Eisenstein imagined Tehuantepec as a state of primitive nature, a womb, a garden of Eden - "Eden did not exist between the Tigris and Euphrates, but rather here, somewhere between the Gulf of Mexico and Tehuantepec".  The "Zandunga" episode in Que Viva Mexico centres around a dreamy beauty, not accidentally named "Concepcion" and represents a vital transition - Mexico's rebirth - between the old decadent order of the hacienda and the new post-revolutionary order.  After Que Viva Mexico, the Tehuana became a staple of the Mexican “national” cinema.

Fernando de Fuentes, La Sandunga 1937, starring Maria Luisa Zea and Lupe Velez.  

In the same year we see a Tehuana modelling a new banknote, sure proof the Tehuana’s arrival as “the national”

Rafael García, Estela Ruiz 1937

Music

Nationalist composers, such as Carlos Chávez, seeking inspiration from national musical traditions, found in Tehuantepec "sones" - particularly the Zandunga - melodies and lyrics that reflected the interaction of Indian and Hispanic influences.

The image and the reality of Tehuantepec

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