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FHR-8-MO

(11-78)

United States Department of the Interior Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form

Homer G.

Phillips

St. Louis Hospital

"Phillips was being operated effectively despite management power shortages, but that patient care and emergency service at City Hospital [#1] was inadequate." Additional support was given to Homer G. Phillips by testimony of doctors such as Carl A. Meyer, Professor of Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, who stated that ". . . if Phillips were closed the St. Louis area would suffer a

loss of its reputation in the medical field.

" 15

The threat of closing Homer G. Phillips until August 17, 1979, when the north side's closed and reduced to the out-patient clinic (which brought unsuccessful protest from the writer as reflecting:

Hospital was

stayed for fifteen years

only public acute care facility was

and emergency care. black community) was

The closing assessed by

one

. . . directly on the position of Blacks in St. Louis and also in dicative of the political maneuvering on the part of area businesses,

universities and elected officials who side the influence of the electorate.

decide on In a more

civic issues out general sense, the

struggle over Homer G. calls with health care delivery to

into account the problems the poor today and in the

associated future.^

The same writer also observed that:

In an area with physicians, the

a 99.9% Black population and a paucity

hospital

is

critical.

It

is

critical

of private for both the

health care of the area's citizenry and community pride -

hospital run by and for Black St. group, the community has a value of any hospital. 17

Louisans.

...

in itself

apart

As with from the

a Black any functioning

The designation of Homer G. Phillips Hospital as a City Landmark in February 1980, was viewed by local black leaders as an important recognition of the insti- tuion's contribution to the city and hopes were raised that the landmark status would advance the cause to reopen the hospital.

As of March 1982,

medical

service remains

restricted to the out-patient clinic

and emergency care.

staff

that

results

of

However,

hope exists

a

feasibility

study

among north side residents for the reopening of Homer

and hospital G. Phillips

(to be announced

in April

1982)

will

enable the black community to reclaim their

own health

care.

regrettably

slim,

While prospects of reopening the hospital

are viewed by many

listing

in

the

National

Register

would

acknowledge

the

black

as

pride and achievement which the hospital Depression-era.

has

represented for the city since the

Footnotes

1975,

Ernest Calloway, p. 16.

"Why Was Homer Phillips

Killed?"

St.

Louis Argus,

5 June

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