X hits on this document

PDF document

THEMES OF ISOLATION IN SASKATCHEWAN RADIO DRAMA - page 102 / 185

614 views

0 shares

0 downloads

0 comments

102 / 185

Bodyscape: Isolation, Health, and the Woman’s Voice

96

Luba's healer-woman, or gotten away to the quiet, pastoral countryside, he may have

found a more down-to-earth, or relational, solution.

The pastoral countryside can provide a tempting, if intangible, escape, as is

proven in Ernie Mutimer’s The Idyll of John Murdoch (1985). The play begins with the

recollections of John, a farmer, recalling the change from “the good old days” to the

“good new days”. John recalls the day Hilda, his wife, almost died of an undisclosed

terminal illness, perhaps cancer. As she lay in the farmhouse dying, John went out to

the meadow and heard a voice. Then, the world changed. John recalls how, to his

delight, the following events took place: factory farms were replaced by local, land-

loving farmers; strip mining for coal was abandoned as people turned to cleaner power

sources; peace broke out across the world; and the radio stations switched from loud,

angry rock music to calm, classical music; transportation also evolves - zeppelins

replace jets and cars, motorboats, skidoos, and buses are replaced with bikes, canoes,

horses and trolleys respectively. All of these changes seem too good to be true. They

are.

John is brought back into reality close to the end of the play. The idyllic world

John has been living in turns out to his own mental creation. Hilda did, in fact, die the

day John heard the voice in the meadow. The shock drove John to retreat into his own

perfect and pleasant mental reality. He regains awareness of reality while receiving

shock treatments, intended to cure him of his mental affliction. John hears traffic

outside the window of his treatment room. He is so terrified at the sound of his utopia

being shattered that he suffers a fatal heart attack. The medical professionals view this

as their failure. John, however, seems happy. As John dies, the listener follows him

Document info
Document views614
Page views616
Page last viewedMon Dec 05 18:51:28 UTC 2016
Pages185
Paragraphs3491
Words63280

Comments