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THEMES OF ISOLATION IN SASKATCHEWAN RADIO DRAMA - page 106 / 185

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Bodyscape: Isolation, Health, and the Woman’s Voice

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cannibalistic, isn’t it, Nana? You finally die. I finally have a baby and as Dina pops out

of the bottom, you climb in at the top end and start making me as mad as you.” Not

only is this possession overwhelming, for a while Carole thinks it is a scientific

inevitability. Carole makes the following argument:

You and me and mother. We’re just part of a long line of chemically defective women, right? Please? We’re so flawed that whenever we come to life’s crossroads, and there are these large, glowing signs saying, “for happiness, turn left” and the other, “for misery, crushing disappointment, and eventual commitment to a centre for the development of greater stability, turn right” our bloodlines invariably snaps us right.

But blood doesn’t prove as predetermining as Carole thinks. While under the

table, Carole also talks to a Young Elsie. The story of Elsie is revealed; in short, she

married for stability and not for love. Elsie loved Ben madly. Ben was a Jew and a

Communist and therefore completely unacceptable to Elsie’s WASP family. Elsie

loved Ben, but chose not to elope with him. Instead, she chose Adam, because “Adam

was always sure.” Adam was also part of the dominant community that Elsie’s family

would find much more acceptable. Nana, in talking to Carole, admits that “I didn’t

know how to come down.” By not “coming down” or following her heart, she lived a

life full of regret. Carole, by listening, has learned how to “come down.” She says,

simply “You fall.” Carole realizes that she has to let herself go just as she did when she

fell in love with her daughter. Fear shouldn’t push out happiness. As Carole reveals,

“You try your best and still, bad things happen. They shatter your heart. Very beautiful

things can happen, too, if you let yourself fall.” Elsie’s fear of falling prevented her

from living life to the fullest. Her choice of husband also represents a refusal to turn

against the tide of what the dominant culture would deem a suitable match for her.

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