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THEMES OF ISOLATION IN SASKATCHEWAN RADIO DRAMA - page 110 / 185

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Bodyscape: Isolation, Health, and the Woman’s Voice

104

did when I was in school and think 'Oh God, they're going to talk about Indians now

and I don't want to look like one of those barbaric savages’” (Arts Week). Acoose: Man

Standing Above Ground was Acoose-Pelletier’s first celebration of Aboriginal pioneers

in radio drama form.

Re-shaping the ethical, political, and personal to include a feminist ethic of care

takes Biblical proportions in Martha Morgan’s Re-Runs (1986, 20:00). In this play, the

medical culture takes the form of a psychological/sociological laboratory experiment.

The play opens on a world in turmoil. An academic has discovered a scroll that states

that it was Adam, not Eve, who first bit the forbidden fruit in the garden of Eden.

World upheaval ensues as male-dominated patterns of thought are challenged and

rejected. Within the safety of a laboratory, a project testing new technology that can

delve into ancestral memory is underway. Test subject Susan is regressed back to Eve.

Research assistant Daniel records what she says. Eve reveals that God created her first.

The serpent then told Eve to ask for a mate. God warns Eve that man will bring war,

destruction, and pain to the earth. Eve convinces God to relent and man is unleashed

upon the earth. Eve admits that “I have brought the scourge of man to the world. But

such a sweet scourge.” As the experiment continues, the computer runs out of control –

even after it has been unplugged. The listener assumes it is divine intervention. The

program can’t be shut down. Eventually, the world disappears. Daniel and Susan wake

up in the garden of Eden. They are now Adam and Eve. Eve takes charge, saying

“Here, have a fig leaf. Things are going to be a little different this time around.” The

assumption is that Eve, this time firmly in charge, will re-build the world in a more

relational way, employing a system more akin to Gilligan’s feminist ethic of care.

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