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THEMES OF ISOLATION IN SASKATCHEWAN RADIO DRAMA - page 82 / 185

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Bodyscape: Isolation, Health, and the Woman’s Voice

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relationships which set the stage for psychological and political trouble. (122)

Gilligan stresses the importance of highlighting “women’s relationship to this societal

and cultural transformation because the history of this relationship is in danger of being

buried” because “a patriarchal social order depends for its regeneration on a

disconnection from women” (123). When women’s voices are heard, a more relational

approach to decision-making follows. When they are buried, the patriarchal norm is re-

enforced.

Further to the discussion of women’s voices, Burke also provides insight into

the largely personal nature of what women write about in radio drama:

Shortest form: Loss. Women write about loss. Slightly longer: Radio is a very quiet genre - a genre that lends itself to the introspective monologue, and musings on secrets. Women playwrights use the silence inside the radio play to make audible the secret aches and fears of their hearts, the stuff they hide from their kids, husbands, and even their friends - the dirt that gets swept under their psychic rugs.

They write plays about the fear of being old and alone. The nightmare of losing a child. The ordinary loss of looking back at roads not taken. And they reflect on loves they regret, and can’t help.

These fears of loss and loneliness can be alleviated by a caring community, or relational

society.

The advancement of social reforms is an important part of the Saskatchewan

myth. Women have always been at the forefront of healthcare debates. The desire to

provide better healthcare was one of the core issues of the women’s suffrage movement

in Saskatchewan. Women like Violet McNaughton (1879-1968) and their fight for a

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